Surreal view…a major hurricane near Western Europe.

Incredible views today…

Hurricane Ophelia set two records: 1) The highest latitude major hurricane on record in the North Atlantic Basin, set beginning at 35.9 N and 2) the most easterly major hurricane on record in the basin, set beginning at 26.6W. It will likely weaken below major hurricane force by Sunday morning as it begins to undergo transition into a frontal cyclone from its interaction with the jet stream and further reduction of sea surface temperatures below 72 degrees F/22 degrees C. However, it will be one for the record books.

Fortunately, Ireland and the United Kingdom will not need to worry about a major hurricane hitting them. They will need to worry about a likely damaging windstorm from a post-tropical hybrid cyclone. The post-tropical incarnation will develop frontal characteristics as it initially weakens, but its strong inner warm-core will continue to release some heat into the system, re-intensifying it as it becomes fully embedded in the mid-latitude westerlies and races into Ireland and the UK Monday afternoon and evening. My updated forecast for Ireland is below. Still expecting winds capable of downing trees and causing major power disruptions. The forecast for intense winds is high in confidence as computer models hone in on the center of the storm either coming ashore the southern tip of Ireland or just grazing the western shore. This is favorable for a “big blow” over the entire island. Residents need to be prepared to stay indoors and stay safe during the day Monday.

Ireland Forecast for Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia:

 

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Forecast zones (North and South) used for my forecast.

 

Monday Morning (After 7 am local time): For the southern half of the island, wind gusts of 40-50 mph (64-80 km/h) will develop during the morning, increasing to 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) by mid to late morning from the coast, northward. The strongest gusts will be along the coastal areas, especially the south shores where isolated gusts may approach 100 mph (161 km/h). For the northern half of the island, wind gusts to 40 mph will develop mid morning , increasing to 50-60 mph late morning, from south to north.

Monday Afternoon (After noon): For the south, wind gusts of 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) early afternoon with isolated to 100 mph/161 km/h along the south/southeast shores). For the north, wind gusts of 50-60 mph (80-97 km/h) early afternoon will increase to 60-85 mph by mid afternoon with isolated gusts to 100 mph along the northeast shores, spreading from south to north into the late afternoon.

Monday Night (after 5 pm local time): For the south, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph (64-89 km/h) during the early evening from south to north. For the north, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph during the mid to late evening (after 7 pm) from south to north.

Sea conditions will be hazardous all around Ireland with wind gusts in excess of 100 mph (161 km/h) likely in the south coastal waters and in the Irish Sea.

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High-resolution Swiss model showing the tightly-packed circulation of then Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia reaching coastal Ireland midday Monday. Damaging winds will be spreading throughout the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland by this time. Shown for illustration of the overall forecast scenario.
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Hurricane Ophelia now a very rare Category 3 storm south of Azores

Hurricane Ophelia has strengthened into a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph as it moves south of the Azores. It is moving over prime atmospheric conditions, even as it overcomes waters of only 25 degrees C/77 degrees F. In normal tropical environments, tropical cyclones need water temperatures of 26 degrees C/79 degrees F to maintain themselves and warmer to significantly strengthen. However, the colder temperatures in the upper-atmosphere associated with the mid-latitude troposphere is providing Ophelia with ample atmospheric instability (warm, moist air rising into cold air aloft intensifying thunderstorm activity). In addition, mid-latitude dynamics are playing a role…the approaching frontal system and associated upper-level trough of low pressure approaching Ophelia is giving the system a “poleward outflow jet” to pull air away from the system and allow the surface low to strengthen.

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Meteorological Analysis of Category 3 Hurricane Ophelia. Favorable dynamic and thermodynamic set up allowing system to strengthen at high latitude, over cooler waters for hurricane maintenance. With that said, water temps under Ophelia are running 2-3 degrees C above normal, also allowing it to have its unusual intensity near Western Europe.

See my previous post from late last night for my wind forecast for Ireland. Strong winds should begin to impact the island midday Monday (local time), with stormy conditions lasting into Monday night. The southeastern Azores will see some gusty winds and 1-3 inches of rain as it passes by this evening and night.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

GOES-16 Satellite Loop of California Wildfire Smoke

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The new geostationary weather satellite, GOES-16 captured this high spatio-temporal resolution loop of the smoke plume over the Bay Area of Northern California this evening before sunset. The deep smoke is embedded in the low-level north winds, while the white, high cirrus clouds are in southwesterly flow. You can right click to save or open in the new tab to see the larger version of it. It’s amazing but frightening to know what’s happening under all that smoke.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Update on Hurricane Maria (2:30 pm EDT). High winds and flooding rains impacting Puerto Rico.

Hurricane Maria is beginning to emerge from the island of Puerto Rico after the center made landfall 8 1/2 hrs ago as a Category 4 storm with max winds of 155 mph (Cat 5 is 156+ so catastrophic wind speeds occurred). 

The hurricane is now a Category 3 storm with 115 mph sustained winds and gusts over 130 mph near the center. Damaging winds and torrential flooding rains will continue for the rest of the afternoon as the system continues to push out into open ocean water.


Most computer models indicate the system should remain offshore the United States as it moves north in a weakness in the upper level higher pressure field caused by the presence of Tropical Storm Jose offshore the Mid-Atlantic and southern New England.

 
The crucial timing to be rid of Maria forever will be the approach of a significant upper level trough of low pressure from the Midwest midweek next week to “kick” the dying hurricane out to sea. Most models show this connection keeping the system offshore being, however there is higher variability in the track after Monday which could bring the system closer to shore than expected. Currently, I feel direct impacts…the tropical storm force wind field and significant rain bands…will likely (66%+ probability) stay offshore. But potential variability makes the situation worth watching closely. 

Regardless, high surf and rip currents (currents which pull water offshore and make swimming dangerous) are likely by early next week. The system will also be weaker offshore the East Coast thanks to less intense sea surface temperatures and increasing vertical wind shear from mid-latitude winds.

In the meantime, direct impacts from a Cat 3-4 storm are likely for north coast of the Dominican Republic, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southern Bahamas. Hurricane warnings are in effect for all these areas. 

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Update on Hurricane Maria (9:25 am EDT). Catastrophic flash flood/violent wind event ongoing.

Maria made landfall as a powerful Category 4 storm near Yabucoa, PR with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph and minimum central pressure of 917 millibars (at 6:35 am EDT). The hurricane continues to move across the island delivering destructive hurricane force winds and torrential amounts of rain leading to massive flash flooding (including 5-7 inch/hr rainfall rates).

The storm currently has max winds of 145 mph. 

River gauges across PR are rising incredibly fast from the high rainfall rates:


Radar near time of landfall (currently offline):

Update on Hurricane Maria (6:30 am EDT)

#Maria is making landfall in eastern Puerto Rico as a Category 4 Hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph. Gusts of 160+ are likely in progress over northeast coast of PR. Catastrophic weather conditions will continue to spread across the island over the next couple of hours. 

Terrible situation for the 3.5 million people hunkering down this morning. 

PR Radar failed just before 6 am EDT. More inbound winds of 155 mph or higher as eyewall moved over radar site (which is in elevated terrain and winds likely much stronger).

Catastrophic Hurricane Irma heading for Leeward Islands. Florida must get ready.

Category 5 Hurricane Irma bearing down on the Leeward Islands at 8:45 am CDT Tuesday.

If you’re in South Florida or the Florida Keys…you need to know what you’ll to once watches and warnings are issued BEFORE they are issued. I do have enough confidence in the path of Hurricane Irma to state that Florida is in a very serious situation based on forecast data and so folks need to 1) track the forecast 2) know your plan, especially if you live in coastal evacuation zones 3) have emergency supplies ready. This storm already has the potential to be devastating for many people all week as it buzzsaws its way through the northern Leeward Islands, close approach to US and British Virgin Islands, then the US territory of Puerto Rico with 3.5 million people, the Dominican Republic, then portions of the Bahamas, before a close passage of the coast of Cuba. And it could do this as a large Category 4-5 hurricane. 
Most likely time of arrival of tropical storm force winds overlay 7 am CDT probability of those winds during 5 day forecast period. Note South Florida is most likely to see winds arrive by Saturday morning and they could arrive overnight Fri-Sat, with the eye not expected near Florida until Sat night-Sun morning.

Get ready, be ready to act if/when watches/warnings are issued and keep track of the latest forecast. Also, hope the best for our friends facing Irma right now.

I’ll updates on Irma throughout the week and you can follow me on Facebook and Twitter.

EDIT AT 10:20 am CDT: Winds in Hurricane Irma increased to 180 mph, making it the most powerful hurricane (by wind) ever observed in the North Atlantic outside the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey