Meteorological Analysis of January 22, 2017 Great Plains/Midwest Blizzard As It Happened

Here is a meteorological analysis I did on Monday of the blizzard which raked much of the Central Plains and upper Midwest from Nebraska and Kansas to Minnesota and Wisconsin with heavy snow and high winds. It was recorded around 11:30 am CST Monday. Those who follow me on my Facebook page (also see my feed on the sidebar) were able to see it right after it was uploaded, but I’m posting it here for those interested in hearing me discuss the event as it happened. Peak snow totals up to a foot and a half resulted in parts of Nebraska, Iowa and Minnesota. Lincoln and surrounding parts of the town only saw 2-3 inches but the totals increased dramatically not far west and north. We got off easy compared to the one foot and greater totals in northeast Nebraska. Winds gusts throughout the region peaked 45-60 mph. You can hear the noise of the high wind through my door in the video.

By the way, my son Bruce makes a guest appearance as he tries to turn off my computer while recording. Haha.


Strong Winter Storm Impacting portions of Plains and Midwest Early Week

A strong winter storm is pushing across the Great Plains tonight. North of the low will experience widespread blizzard conditions and heavy snow. South of the low milder conditions with rain.

Infrared image, but with surface frontal analysis added, valid at 6 pm CST.


Parts of far southern Nebraska, into Iowa have a tight gradient between little to no snow vs. heavy snow with high winds. An example…my location in Lincoln, NE where the National Weather Service is calling for 3-4 inches for the day Monday and just added the county under a blizzard warning after 24 hrs ago thinking the area would only receive up to 1 inch with gusty winds and much better travel conditions.

A difference less than 24 hrs makes. Lincoln now expects up to half a foot of snow (see below) and places expecting 7-8 inches are now expecting 12-18 inches!


The whole system has been trending southeastward in the models and in reality and so the official forecast has been trended slightly higher and significantly so in places of central and northeastern Nebraska which may get up to a foot with isolated amounts up to 18 inches! The bigger story are winds which may gusts 35-50+ mph across much of the north-central Plains during the night and during the day Monday. This will induce the blizzard conditions, with very low visibilities.


Conditions will improve across Nebraska and South Dakota by tomorrow evening as the storm shifts northeastward, continuing to impact northern Iowa and southern Minnesota, as well as Wisconsin and upper Michigan with locally heavy snow and gusty winds.

If you’re in an area under blizzard or winter storm warnings, stay off the roads during the worst of the conditions unless absolutely necessary as the roads will be treacherous and visibility poor, particularly outside major cities, where snow can blow around easily. If you have to travel, drive slowly and with care.

Life Update

I thought now would be a good time to update on my life as some big changes are ahead. My fiance, son and I will be moving to St. Cloud, MN at the beginning of January. I’ve been accepted into the Geographic Information Science master’s program at St. Cloud State University. GISci is the study of the theory and applications of geographic information systems (hardware and software apps) for collecting, storing, and manipulating location data for visualization, analysis and modeling. I will be pursuing a second master’s degree (first is in Geosciences – Applied Meteorology from Mississippi State in 2016).

Our primary reason to move is to be closer to my side of the family. My Mom, grandparents and many cousins all live in the Minneapolis Metro area. St. Cloud is less than a hour away from where many of them live. However, I decided after much thought, to return to school for GIS because I’ve had a lot of interest in the technology and applications of it since I was a meteorology/climatology major at the University of Nebraska and there are many career opportunities for those with expertise in the technology and theory of it in many fields. Meteorology is *much* harder to get into (which I knew going in), and while I certainly am open to meteorology and experience (more on that in a bit), I want to gain much greater knowledge in a highly valued field. I’ve taken a few GIS and cartography courses as an undergrad and required intro course as a graduate student, but there is much left for me to learn which could go a long way toward career prospects. I’m doing the thesis-track option (my first masters was non-thesis), but I’m still formulating details on what I want to research, beyond ideas I briefly discussed in my graduate statement of intent.

On another note, for the 2nd year, I’ll be doing online mountain weather forecasting for the Fire Weather & Avalanche Center, based in northeast Oregon. The FWAC is a non-profit organization which does forecasting (mostly volunteer) for fire weather and snowfall and avalanche hazards, focused on northeast Oregon, although weather is discussed throughout the Pacific Northwest. The focus in particular is on back country recreation and travel. I will begin my weekly Saturday and Sunday 48 hr forecast shifts this weekend through this winter. Again, mostly volunteer, but valuable experience which regularly utilizes my skills as a forecaster. I’m hoping to have involvement in the fire weather operations next year. In the meantime, look for links to my Oregon mountain forecasts for the FWAC posted on my Twitter and Facebook feeds as they are written. The interactive mountain weather forecast page is HERE.

It will be a busy couple of months, but the changes should be very positive!

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–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey


JPL 2017 Eclipse Simulator

Anyone want to know what the 2017 Eclipse will look like at your location with nice graphics and all? Check out this excellent simulator put together by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. You’ll be able to animate the eclipse for any given location in the US from beginning to end and find out what to expect. I made a collection of some of the locations which will experience partial eclipses (all at their time of maximum eclipse). All these location were in areas of 75% or greater obscuration of the solar disk. Optical and atmospheric effects begin to take hold with 75% obscuration as incoming shortwave radiation from the sun is significantly reduced. Read more about that in my previous July post HERE if you haven’t already. Remember, however, that even with 99% obscuration, the sun will still be too bright and therefore too dangerous too look at directly without certified eclipse glasses. Direct viewing of the sun for multiple minutes can blind you, any amount can cause eye injury!

Seattle, WA. My home city! 92% Obscuration.
Portland, OR. 99% Obscuration. So close to totality, yet so far!
San Francisco
San Francisco, CA. 75.5% Obscuration.
Denver, CO. 92% Obscuration.
Brookings, SD. The location of my undergraduate alma mater South Dakota State University. 89% Obscuration.
Minneapolis, MN. My Mom and much of my extended family lives here. They’ll take in the show. 83% Obscuration.
Dallas, TX. 75% Obscuration.
Atlanta, GA. 97% Obscuration.
Washington, DC. 81% Obscuration.
Jacksonville, FL. 90.5% Obscuration.

Additional eclipse info for this post (such as max eclipse time) is courtesy of Xavier Jubier’s 2017 Total Eclipse Interactive Map.