Surreal view…a major hurricane near Western Europe.

Incredible views today…

Hurricane Ophelia set two records: 1) The highest latitude major hurricane on record in the North Atlantic Basin, set beginning at 35.9 N and 2) the most easterly major hurricane on record in the basin, set beginning at 26.6W. It will likely weaken below major hurricane force by Sunday morning as it begins to undergo transition into a frontal cyclone from its interaction with the jet stream and further reduction of sea surface temperatures below 72 degrees F/22 degrees C. However, it will be one for the record books.

Fortunately, Ireland and the United Kingdom will not need to worry about a major hurricane hitting them. They will need to worry about a likely damaging windstorm from a post-tropical hybrid cyclone. The post-tropical incarnation will develop frontal characteristics as it initially weakens, but its strong inner warm-core will continue to release some heat into the system, re-intensifying it as it becomes fully embedded in the mid-latitude westerlies and races into Ireland and the UK Monday afternoon and evening. My updated forecast for Ireland is below. Still expecting winds capable of downing trees and causing major power disruptions. The forecast for intense winds is high in confidence as computer models hone in on the center of the storm either coming ashore the southern tip of Ireland or just grazing the western shore. This is favorable for a “big blow” over the entire island. Residents need to be prepared to stay indoors and stay safe during the day Monday.

Ireland Forecast for Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia:

 

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Forecast zones (North and South) used for my forecast.

 

Monday Morning (After 7 am local time): For the southern half of the island, wind gusts of 40-50 mph (64-80 km/h) will develop during the morning, increasing to 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) by mid to late morning from the coast, northward. The strongest gusts will be along the coastal areas, especially the south shores where isolated gusts may approach 100 mph (161 km/h). For the northern half of the island, wind gusts to 40 mph will develop mid morning , increasing to 50-60 mph late morning, from south to north.

Monday Afternoon (After noon): For the south, wind gusts of 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) early afternoon with isolated to 100 mph/161 km/h along the south/southeast shores). For the north, wind gusts of 50-60 mph (80-97 km/h) early afternoon will increase to 60-85 mph by mid afternoon with isolated gusts to 100 mph along the northeast shores, spreading from south to north into the late afternoon.

Monday Night (after 5 pm local time): For the south, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph (64-89 km/h) during the early evening from south to north. For the north, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph during the mid to late evening (after 7 pm) from south to north.

Sea conditions will be hazardous all around Ireland with wind gusts in excess of 100 mph (161 km/h) likely in the south coastal waters and in the Irish Sea.

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High-resolution Swiss model showing the tightly-packed circulation of then Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia reaching coastal Ireland midday Monday. Damaging winds will be spreading throughout the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland by this time. Shown for illustration of the overall forecast scenario.
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