The Struggle of the Trees in the era of increasing extremes

As the Arctic continues to warm abruptly because of anthropogenic climate change, the jet stream is exhibiting increasingly high amplitude waves later into the Spring growing season. This has been an apparent pattern through recent decades, but has become more pronounced in recent years. You can learn more about the research of Arctic amplification and the jet stream HERE (Dr. Jennifer Francis) and a more real-time analysis at the time HERE (January 2018; Paul Beckwith). Climate change is becoming abrupt enough, its changes on weather, long-term climate patterns and biology can be seen on yearly to seasonal timescales, where before, changes were over decades. So fast, scientific research can barely keep up and every story has “[faster, bigger, worse, more, etc] than expected”. Been the dizzying mantra of late-2017 into 2018 actually. It’s been rough on early agricultural activities in North America and Europe and it’s also been hard on trees trying to get started on first leaf growth.

Here in Lincoln, NE, the trees the week of April 24th have been struggling to get started with leaf growth. Lilacs are running 16-20 days behind first leaves because it has simply been too cold. We’ve had a few more warm days, recently, but yesterday and today…more chill.

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Here’s a photo of my son from this time a year ago. Notice the trees.

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Here’s from a walk I took on Monday.

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Tuesday…

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Seeing so many leaf-less trees with only some trying to bud has left me with a weird spooky feeling going for walks. And on Monday, walking down the street for thirty blocks (longest walk I’ve done in awhile) was actually hot because of the lack of shade from any leaves. And if you want to know just what stresses these trees have been through, it’s not just about persistent chill over the course of weeks. Very extreme temperature variability as well.

-April 13th. High temperature 82 F after the passage of a strong warm front associated with the powerful midlatitude cyclone which produced blizzard conditions across the Northern Plains and severe weather in the Deep South that week/weekend.

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April 14th. Twenty-four hours later. Non-diurnal temperature drop from April 13th’s high to 32 F following the passage of a powerful cold front. This was the most extreme temperature change I’ve ever experienced at the same location (and this photo is from the same parking lot as above, looking in the opposite direction). I’ve lived in Seattle, WA, Lincoln, NE and Brookings, SD. 50 degree F temperature drop. From early-June to early-February weather conditions.

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Other locations, such as in Oklahoma experienced temperature changes last week of 50-60+ degrees in 10 hours (near freezing to around 100 degrees)!!

More persistent warming and less temperature variability is expected this weekend into next week. It may finally start to feel like Spring where I am. Severe weather looks possible to impact the Southern Plains next Tuesday and Wednesday. One oddity of note are no tornadoes reported so far in Nebraska, Kansas, or Oklahoma in 2018. Nebraska typically averages (1991-2010) six tornadoes during the January-April period, with Kansas and Oklahoma averaging 17 tornadoes. But so far…zero for all three states. Nebraska has been too cold and Kansas and Oklahoma have either been too cold and dry with occasional extreme heat (by April standards…again, 90s to  near 100 in the arid drought areas). Extreme to exceptional drought conditions with little rain (and obviously few thunderstorms) have been plaguing the Southern Plains for months. Some storms in May may decrease in intensity of the drought mildly, but very destructive drought conditions for agriculture and hydrology will continue across the Southern Plains and Southwest US. Hoping it will not spread north into Nebraska, but abnormally warm conditions are expected across the southern half of the Plains this summer. Harsh on the plants and crops going from long cold to a long, hot summer. Not to mention more monster wildfires and dust storms. Oklahoma suffered unbelievable wildfires last week.

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Wildfires which were ongoing the afternoon of April 17th in SE Colorado, Western Oklahoma, and the Texas Panhandle.
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A dust storm captured by satellite over drought-stricken eastern Colorado and western Kansas the afternoon of April 17th.

Check out this extensive (of what at the time was live) video on April 17th of the wildfires in Western OK as they were being chased by KFOR (Oklahoma City) reporters Val and Amy Castor. It’s 3 hrs worth of video, but it’s a Facebook video, easy to fast-forward through and you can see how bad the fires were as they happened.

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As mentioned, severe weather may escalate on the Southern Plains (at least Oklahoma and North Texas) next week. Nebraska has been fairly quiet on the severe storm front, but with the clmatological peak months coming (May/June), there will likely be an escalation of activity. Still remains how much more activity there will actually be. While one needs wave action in the polar jet stream to stimulate the movement of warm-moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and vertical wind shear needed for rotating thunderstorms, very pronounced troughs right over the Plains with large ridging extending into Western Canada can mean cool air intrusions to the east and much of the severe weather and heavier rainfall restricted to the southeastern Plains and Southeast as has been the case much of the winter. The now weakening La Nina pattern of the El-Nino Southern Oscillation has been partly to blame for this (as well as other randomly oscillating “teleconnection” patterns”). However, in addition, the intense climate change-induced Arctic heatwaves in this winter’s polar night (climatologically extreme heat, record low ice extents, ‘atmospheric rivers’ of heat and moisture and ocean storms in the Arctic Ocean) caused the wintertime stratospheric polar vortex maintaining the circulation around the Arctic to split. This has become increasingly consistent and more intense in its effect on the Arctic and mid-latitudes the past few winters. This produced very wavy jet stream patterns and areas of abnormally very cold conditions over Europe and the Central US as well as the repeated nor’easter pattern offshore the East Coast in March.

-Splitting and migration of the winter polar vortex in the stratosphere (10 millibar pressure surface, so lines are lines of equal height…above 33,000 ft in the mid-latitudes generally).

 

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There are signs in the long-range ensemble models that a highly amplified high pressure ridge build over Western North America late next week into early the following week, providing persistent abnormal heat and of course dry conditions. This would consistent with a pronounced positive phase of the Pacific-North American Pattern (PNA) which features abnormally high mid-atmospheric pressures and surface temperatures over western North America. Such a pattern would also decrease severe storm and rainfall potential on much of the Plains during the second week of May. While severe storms are never a positive for safety, the rainfall from convection is always a plus for keeping drought conditions at bay and the northern Plains are in need of regular rainfall as many places not in drought are still suffering precipitation deficits on the month and/or year. If Arctic sea ice retreats rapidly this melt season (and we’re within years of sea ice disappearing in the warm season), this may promote very amplified upper-level high pressure systems this summer as the low albedo (reflectivity) of exposed dark ocean warms the lower atmospheric column, causing thermal expansion and causing any upper-level high pressure systems overhead to respond with greater poleward amplification and strengthening. This could mean very anomalous heat and dry conditions in the summer which persist. This possibility seems focused on the West, although unusually high heat and continued extensive drought may impact the Southern Plains, depending on how the pattern regime sets up. Very important for agriculture this season which I’ll be watching. California, in particular, seems to be progressing into the climate change-induced “weather whiplash” pattern of extreme drought-rainfall, which will only worsen in the coming years. Intensifying drought this summer and the possible return of El Nino later this fall (still up in the air on that) could cause more of this. Lots to keep track of this year.

—Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

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Stay safe out there today! Severe storms likely and in progress.

Nebraska is in the ice box still…but big storms, including tornadoes and significant straight line wind damage possible in parts of Indiana and Kentucky today.

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Warm, moist air, and lots of vertical wind shear. Good set up for some nasty severe weather.

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Prominent severe weather threat is between the polar and subtropical jets (northerly and southerly branches, respectively). In between, lots of mass is being removed allowing for storms to explode from below, intensify rapidly and maintain themselves in the highly sheared environment (winds rapidly increasingly with height).

There is a lot of speed shear, but not as much change in direction with height, which favors lines of storms. So the threat for damaging winds is quite significant, hence the “moderate risk” (4 out of 5 on the overall scale by the Storm Prediction Center) for a 45% chance of damaging wind reports within 25 miles of a point within the given region, and a 10% or higher chance of winds over 74 mph (hurricane-force). However, a significant tornado risk also exists for storms which do isolated themselves earlier this afternoon. So remain vigilant if you are in these areas and tell anyone you know to remain ready to take cover this afternoon and evening!

My part of Nebraska?

Unseasonably cold. Just straight up…cold. Starting off spring as if it were February with temperatures 25-30 degrees F below normal for highs and 15-20 degrees below normal for lows. Will have some recovery later this week, but near normal conditions (+-5 degrees F) don’t appear consistently likely until early next week. Thursday may give us a one day break with mid-50s (normal is around 60 F). So far our warmest day this year was March 3rd (73 F). The Great Plains have been part of the very wild weather pattern impacting much of the mid to upper mid-latitudes this year thanks to a highly oscillating jet stream with periods of very cold and very warm conditions relative to local norms. Much of Europe has gone through the same with very cold Arctic air mass spells, while the parts of the East Coast had record heat in February, followed by multiple cold and heavy snow periods from damaging nor’easters. All while the Arctic roasted in heat waves in this winter (relative to their norms) has significant heat and moisture moved northward, hitting sea ice hard. Here in my locality, we’ve had the roller-coaster ride of going from a a high of 4 to a high of 56 in ten days (January), a high of 22 to a high of 65 in seven days (February; and actually the high was 58 two days before that high of 22…ha!) to our mid-May days in early March (low-70s). Now after the last 5 days of March in the more seasonable 50s to low-60s, we’re spending the first three days of April barely above freezing. Winter was wild and Spring is starting off confusing weather even by spring standards. At least it’s not record breaking cold, it is unusually cold regardless though. Looking forward to the actual warmth of spring again.

Effect of Sun-Mon Arctic Ocean Storm on Sea Ice

You may remember I posted last Friday about the major North Atlantic storm which was expected to move into the Arctic Ocean Sunday and Monday producing hurricane-force winds, 30 ft+ waves and temperatures over 40 degrees F above normal (near or even above freezing in places). Well that storm advanced through the Arctic and now noticeable effects can be seen (via satellite analysis) on sea ice concentration (amount of ice vs. open water in a given area) and on sea ice sheet growth and resulting extent.

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North Atlantic Surface Analysis valid at 06 UTC February 5th (midnight CST) showing the 958 millibar low pressure system off shore northeast Greenland entering the Arctic Ocean from the North Atlantic basin. (US National Weather Service)
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Global Forecast System model analysis valid 12 UTC February 5th (6 am CST). This shows the very strong sustained winds and (by Arctic standards north of 80N) extremely warm temperatures during the height of the storm. This was thanks to very strong warm air advection from the Atlantic Ocean. The system had a sub-tropical connection with heat and moisture originating from the subtropical western Atlantic. Average temperatures in many places should be -30 to -15 F (-34 to -26 C). (earth.nullschool.net)

Included are two images of the sea ice concentration…one I saved from the February 3rd, another just posted for February 6th. Lighter blues are for 90-95% concentration, with yellows and reds being for 75-90%.

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Extent growth basically stopped between February 3-6 (near 13,300,000 sq km for four days).

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2018 year-to-date extent (currently at record lows) vs 2016 extent (previous daily record lows for this time of year) and the 1980s average. Sea ice extent and volume collapse is underway in the Arctic Ocean because of Anthropogenic Climate Change caused by abrupt warming in the Arctic (notable since the 1980s, accelerating since the 2000s). 

More very above normal temperatures will hit the Arctic this weekend as a powerful blocking high pressure system over the Pacific (sound familiar…) raises temps once again across Alaska and allows storm tracks to head for the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea once again. Meanwhile, the Atlantic side will continue to remain “open” with another storm also moving into the region this weekend. No storm appears to be nearly as powerful as the Sunday-Monday event, but the litany of systems bringing at least some wind, wave action and temps not far below the freezing point of salt water is no good for the Arctic.

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Temperature anomaly (degrees above or below average) forecast by the GFS model for the Arctic region valid 18 UTC February 10th (noon CST). Normal is based on 1981-2010 baseline. To approximate the major effect of anthropogenic climate change since the end of the 18th century add +0.9 degrees C (K).
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GFS maximum temperature forecast valid 18 UTC February 10th (noon CST). Very warm air temperatures on both the Atlantic and Pacific entrances to the Arctic Ocean.

Arctic sea ice is extremely important for everything from Arctic regional ecology, marine biology to effects on overall warming of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding land areas (and permafrost). There is also evidence that the rapid warming of the Arctic because of anthropogenic climate change is altering the polar jet stream circulation which may be leading to an increased frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events. 

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Sea ice thickness and thickness anomalies in January 2018. (Zach Labe)

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

 

 

Wild Ride – More Cold Intrusions into North America/Europe, Powerful Warm Storm Headed for Arctic Ocean Monday

This winter has been a fascinating one to say the least. Wild oscillations between very abnormally warm and very abnormally cold while other places are are just consistently very warm. Or perhaps just very dry. Much of this has been thanks to the current La Nina pattern in place over the Tropical Pacific. The atmospheric pattern leading to abnormally cooler waters over the eastern tropical region also lead to the promotion of strong high pressure systems over the Central North Pacific with unusually higher amplitude jet streams. This favors a polar jet aiming for the Pacific Northwest, northern tier and into the northeastern third of the country while the Southwest and Sunbelt see drier conditions.

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Conditions of at least “Abnormally Dry” cover over 67% of the Continental US. It is the most coverage in abnormally dry conditions since February 5, 2013. It is, interestingly, the 49th greatest extent of at least Abnormally Dry conditions on record out of 944 recorded weekly updates (over 18 years now). Conditions of at least D1 “Moderate Drought” coverage over 38% of the Continental US. It is the most coverage in D1 conditions since April 22, 2014.

Of note with this pattern regime has been the, at times, extreme nature of the jet stream amplitudes. They have driven very warm temperatures into the Arctic with record low sea ice across the Arctic Ocean, the warmest December on record across the state of Alaska, and record high temperatures in portions of the Southwest US in January with the aforementioned persistent drying and intensifying drought concerns. 

Meanwhile, significant Arctic intrusions have been impacting the US, particularly in January and more appear likely in February as “teleconnections”…patterns in global circulation which give clues toward a general weather regime for a region of the world…show signs of further intense extreme jet stream amplitudes with very strong upper-level high pressure systems blocking storm tracks over the north Pacific and Bering Sea, which downstream will mean a cross polar flow in the upper atmosphere of very cold air upper troughs and surface Arctic fronts and high pressure systems over northern Plains/Midwest into the Northeast US. The Deep South should escape as warmer air from the subtropics attempts to advance north and may keep the Arctic air at bay. Europe looks to also have periods of similar cold (and interior Siberia of course! Check out the incredible cold they had last month).

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Temperature Anomalies in the US (Sunday, Thursday) and in Europe (Monday). Widespread temps below freezing during the day in parts of central and Eastern US and central and eastern Europe during these cold periods. Very persistent warmth with highs in the 60-80s in the Southwest US.

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Powerful Arctic Ocean Storm Sunday-Tuesday

While the mid-latitudes get hit with Arctic cold, the Arctic is being pounded by significant amounts of mid-latitude heat. And now the computer models are pointing towards a major North Atlantic storm developing early this weekend, moving over Greenland and then into the middle of the Arctic Ocean Sunday night-Monday. This storm will be very powerful…as strong as any classic North Atlantic ocean winter storm, and will bring significant amounts of high winds, battering waves and high “heat” to the Arctic. How warm? Perhaps as warm as 50-60 degrees F above normal temperatures over much of the Arctic Ocean. This will mean highs near or just above freezing up to the North Pole!

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Temperature forecast by the Global Forecast System model for noon CST Monday showing near or above freezing temperature penetrating deep into the interior Arctic as a result of intense warm air advection.
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A significant sector of the Arctic Ocean will have air temperatures over 40 degrees F above normal (or higher) during the day Monday.

This storm is forecast to initially form southwest of the tip of Greenland and east of Quebec Friday and will beginning moving over Greenland Saturday. Sunday, the system will begin to impact the Arctic, with warm and moisture transport from the North Atlantic (all the way from the Azores!) increasing abruptly late-Sunday. By Monday morning, models indicate waves moving up the Fram Strait toward the Arctic may be as high as 30 ft in strong south-southwesterly flow. Over the sea ice sheet, the low pressure system will be intense as it emerges from Greenland…possibly sub-960 millibars with widespread wind gusts of up to hurricane-force likely over much of the interior Arctic Ocean east and south of the low on the Atlantic side.

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GFS depiction of the powerful low pressure system over the central Arctic Ocean on Monday. The European model has a similar strength low. Winds up to hurricane-force wind gusts and battering waves are likely conditions for the tenuous sea ice.
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Forecast significant wave heights for early Monday with the worst of it in the Fram Strait.

Why this storm is so significant is because the Arctic sea ice is continuing to undergo collapse because of anthropogenic climate change. If the Arctic climate warms to the point that it simply cannot support sea ice in the warm season, with the Arctic Ocean warming as a result of very low albedo (reflectivity to visible light which would otherwise limit warming) compared to white ice (or latent heat of melting/freezing, instead of heat going into warming the ocean directly), this will have dramatic effects on not only regional climate but global climate (I can go into greater details in this in the comments or provide resources). Generally this was something expected much later in the future, but may occur earlier than expected, although it is difficult to predict when exactly this will occur as it would be nonlinear and abrupt. However, as mentioned, ice volume and extent for ice are running at record or near record lows across the Arctic Basin. Some of these effects on albedo and heating have already begun to be felt over the past several years on the marginal seas which are beginning to become increasingly ice free during the warm season (Chukchi Sea, Beaufort Sea, Eastern Siberian Sea), but it’s important to not have the interior Arctic Ocean lose significant ice. Particularly in the winter, but it has been struggling just to freeze this winter! For more on recent sea ice developments see these videos by Paul Beckwith (M.Sc, PhD candidate; HERE and HERE).

In the meantime, while we have year to year variability…various teleconnection patterns, anthropogenic forcing (CO2, other gasses) is the most dominant regime on our climate and so even while I must emphasize weather is not climate…I must also emphasize that climate is a statistical distribution of weather events; and so extreme weather events which are increasing in frequency and magnitude are a sign of our climate shifting to more extreme conditions and in sensitive places (particularly cold climates like the Arctic), those shifts are incredibly noticeable.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Discussion of Final Analysis of 2017 Hurricane Harvey

The 2017 North Atlantic Hurricane season was a devastating one in terms of loss of life as well as property damage for the United States and the Caribbean. The National Hurricane Center released its post-season report on Harvey which caused great destruction to parts of Southeast Texas and Southwest Louisiana. What follows is a brief summary and discussion of Harvey based on info from that report as well as other sources related to Harvey’s impacts. The full report is linked at the end of this post in the references.

Meteorological Discussion

What became Harvey was originally a tropical disturbance which came off the West Coast of Africa on August 12th. It is common during August and September for land-based thunderstorm complexes known as mesoscale convective systems to move westward off the African coast near or south of the Cape Verde (also known as the Cabo Verde) Islands and later develop into long-lived tropical cyclones. Harvey was a classic “cape-verde” type storm as it would later develop into a tropical depression with a well-defined center on August 16th.

The depression intensified into a storm and given its name 12 hrs after initial development. It peaked over the open Atlantic at 40 knots (~45 mph), moving over the islands of Barbados and St. Vincent on August 18th. However, increasing vertical wind shear (increasing winds with height tilting and blowing the thunderstorms away from the low pressure center) over the central Caribbean Sea lead to Harvey’s dissipation to a remnant low later that day.

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Harvey moving over Barbados and St. Vincent on August 18, 2017.

The remnant circulation moved over the Yucatan Peninsula on Aug 22nd and redeveloped into a tropical depression over Bay of Campeche on August 23rd, 150 n mi west of Progreso, Yucatan, Mexico.

The initially poor organization of the reformed Harvey transitioned to a period of rapid intensification late on the 23rd as deep convection began to concentrate near the center. This was aided by an environment of light shear, very warm sea surface temperatures and high mid-level moisture. Intensification would continue until landfall on the 26th. Harvey reached Category 3 midday on the 25th and intensified into a Category 4 as it made its landfalls on the Texas coast early August 26th (the evening of the 25th local time). The initial landfall was on San Jose Island, TX as a Category 4 with maximum sustained winds of 130 mph (115 knots) with a second landfall on mainland Texas in northeast Copano Bay as a Category 3 with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph (105 knots). Wind damage was extreme and devastating in Aransas, Nueces, Refugio and the eastern part of San Patricio Counties. 15,000 homes were destroyed and 25,000 homes damaged. The City of Rockport was hit the hardest as the Category 3+ wind field moved into that area causing both extensive wind and surge impacts. The highest surge observed in Harvey was generally in the range of 9-11 ft.

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Hurricane Harvey approaching landfall on the Texas Coast the evening of August 25, 2017 (local time).
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Hurricane Harvey making landfall in Texas as seen by radar. Note the “lumpy”, wavy undulations within the eye (such as near Rockport and north of Port Aransas in this image). These are mesovortices where winds may have been locally stronger within the inner eye wall of the hurricane.

Harvey meandered in light steering currents, “stuck” between a mid-tropospheric high pressure system over the Four Corners states and another mid-troposphere high over the Gulf of Mexico. Torrential rains fell over Houston Metro and the Golden Triangle near a stationary front which formed on the north and east side of Harvey.

 

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The rainfall of Harvey was truly incredible. A storm total of 60.58 inches was confirmed Nederland, TX; 60.54 inches in Groves, TX. Much of the heaviest precipitation fell in the first 72 hrs of the event. Previous continental US record for a tropical cyclone is 48 inches in Medina, TX (1978). The extreme nature of Harvey was displayed in that 18 values over that continental record of 48 inches reported across southeastern TX, with 36-48 inches recorded across the Houston metro area. However, Multi-Sensor Precipitation Estimates (MPE), which includes radar-derived rainfall intensity estimates suggests 65-70 inches where few observations were available or observations failed early in the event. Maximum rainfall measured in Louisiana was 23.71 inches in Vinton, LA, with MPE suggesting a more representative 40 inches as Southeast Southwest LA obs were sparse.

By Jordan Tessler for Capitol Weather Gang.

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The large-scale or synoptic set up for the Harvey exceptional rainfall event is not particularly unique. Heavy rain bands formed along a modest frontal boundary situated initially near Houston, then the Golden Triangle region in Southeast TX (Beaumont, Port Arthur, Orange, TX area). Enhanced convergence and convective lift with warm cloud droplet precipitation processes allowed for enhanced rainfall rates in abundant thunderstorms. The combination of extremely high rainfall rates of up to 5-7 inches per hour and the stationary nature of the near coastal frontal boundary and Harvey itself contributed to the extreme total accumulation and massive flooding.

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Training rain bands moving over the Houston Metro area the morning of August 27, 2017.
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Very heavy rainfall in the Golden Triangle region of east TX the early morning of August 30, 2017.

NOAA analysis determined that areas of Southeast TX experience a flood with an annual probability of <0.1% (equivalent to a >1000 year flood event). I believe this is one of the most important parts of the National Hurricane Center report, so I’ll quote it:

While established records of this nature are not kept, given the exceptional exceedance probabilities, it is unlikely the United States has ever seen such a sizable area of excessive tropical cyclone rainfall totals as it did from Harvey.

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Mesoscale Precipitation Discussion by the National Weather Service – Weather Prediction Center on August 27, 2017. Historic, devastating flooding underway in the Houston Metro Area at the time.

In addition to storm surge, wind and flooding rains, Harvey produced 57 tornadoes (many in the Houston Metro area) and killed 68 people directly with an additional 35 indirect deaths. All direct deaths were in Texas and it was the deadliest tropical cyclone for Texas since 1919. All but three direct deaths were caused by freshwater flooding.

According to NOAA, preliminary damage analysis suggests estimated damages of $125 billion, making Harvey the second-costliest hurricane on record in the North Atlantic basin, only behind Hurricane Katrina, when adjusted for inflation.


Connection to Anthropogenic (human-caused) Climate Change

During and immediately following the events of Hurricane Harvey, there was intense controversy over even discussing climate change as it related to the extreme events related to Hurricane Harvey. Even mentioning climate change in reference to an individual extreme weather event. A lot of opinions were thrown about, but the science of climate change has evolved dramatically in the past 10 years and climate researchers have a much better understanding of many of the connections between climate variables and the statistics of weather which make up the recent past and current climate. From this, attribution studies can be conducted to determine a likelihood of connection to the changing climate regime. A attribution study was done by World Weather Attribution (#2 below) and the probabilistic statistical analysis determined that the record rainfall from Harvey was approximately a) 3 times more likely and b) 15% more intense in terms of rainfall rate because of climate change. One location witnessed a return period for extreme rainfall of 9000 years with a high degree of statistical confidence. The impacts were consistent with what would be expected with 1 degree C+ of global warming since the late 19th century (the world has thought to have begun warming because of humanity since the mid 18th century). I did an extensive post previously during this most recent hurricane season on the climate change connection with includes references to numerous recent peer reviewed papers HERE.

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References

#1 – Harvey Report (National Hurricane Center, 2018)

#2 – Oldenborogh et al. 2017

See my previous posts in this blog on Hurricane Harvey from last August HERE.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Multiple Arctic Air Surges Expected Into Next Week

After periods of very abnormally warm weather, surges of very cold air from the Arctic will be barreling out of Canada starting Thursday into next week.

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European model model depiction of morning temperatures over the US and southern Canada at 6 am CST Tuesday 12/26. May be colder with winds.
These cold surges are a result of a highly amplified jet stream which has been shifting around North America for the past few weeks with a strong ridge over the Western US and trough over the US. However, the ridge is retreating over the Eastern Pacific and intensifying into Alaska, heating up the Arctic and putting southern Canada and the US in the ice box.

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US Global Forecast System model forecast for 6 pm CST Thursday 12/21 showing highly amplified wave pattern of atmosphere at 500 millibar pressure surface (approximately 18,000 ft altitude).

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“HOT” Arctic. Temperatures in Barrow, AK running over 30 degrees F above normal on Thursday (normal high is -3 F). Normal low is -15 F. That abnormal warmth will become less intense, but persist into next week.
The Storm Prediction Center does have a marginal risk of severe weather ahead of this week’s major frontal system over Southeast TX Friday. The risk appears to be for a isolated severe thunderstorm wind gusts over 60 mph and low risks of tornadoes.

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Here in the land of the corn? We should peak in the upper-30s tomorrow morning and then have falling temperatures and increasing winds during the afternoon with freezing drizzle with increasing breezy conditions out of the northwest. Not much snow accumulation expected here, although it could get slick from some of the freezing precipitation. Anyone else in the middle of the country, be careful as the cold air moves in if you’re on the roads!


Quick update on the Thomas Fire in California:

As of this post, the fire burned 272,000 acres…the 2nd largest in California state history (within less than 1500 acres of the state record). It has killed two people, including a firefighter. It is 60% contained. It began December 4th.

No significant rainfall is expected is expected in Southern California through the end of the month based on computer models. The Eastern Pacific ridge of high pressure seems to have a dominant grip on the region unfortunately. A combination of a La Nina pattern and climate change-induced extremely low Arctic sea ice and warm Arctic causing an incredibly amplified jet stream which tends to produce “stuck” and “stale” patterns.

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European model forecast accumulated precipitation through 12/30 showing the possibility of little to no measurable rain or snowfall in much of the Southwest US. Been little to be had in that region in December.
We can only wait and see if the lack of rain and snow forecast in the models in fact verifies for the Southwest US.

Happy first day of (astronomical) winter!

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Major Pattern Change for North America and Arctic Next Week.

A major weather pattern shift will be occur next week for North America into the Arctic as the jet stream…which already has been largely higher in amplitude and experiencing some blocking with little eastward progression of long-waves in the upper-atmosphere, will becoming extremely amplified (north-south) next week bringing very warm air up into Alaska, Yukon and the Arctic Ocean and a modified Arctic air mass from Nunavut and the Northwest Territories of Canada into the central US. Let’s take a look at things.

The current pattern dominating North America has been strong ridge of high pressure over the Western US or Eastern Pacific with a prominent trough over the eastern US with some fluctuation in the wave pattern east or west, but not much significant change, except in the center of the country which has seen more significant swings between these two states. The east, including even the Southeast saw significant snow. The west has seen abnormal warmth with record fires in California. Currently the ridge of upper-atmosphere ridge is forecast by US and European models to build to an extremely high amplitude the end of next week north over portions of Alaska and Yukon and into the margins of the Arctic Ocean. This as a very intense trough is forced south over the US.

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European model forecast for the wave pattern of the mid-level atmosphere valid 6 pm CST 12/23.
This extreme amplification will drive an Arctic surface air high pressure system out of the Northwest Territories with very cold air this week, with this air mass advancing into the US beginning Thursday into this weekend. Meanwhile stormier conditions will moving from the Bering Sea into the Chukchi Sea driving up temperatures in the far north. And California with all the fires? Remains abnormally warm and dry.

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Temperatures the afternoon of Christmas Eve (European Model forecast).

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Greatest signal for low to no precipitation the next 10 days is south-central to southern CA into much of AZ and NV.
The Arctic:

As I spoke about in a previous post, the Arctic is having its second warmest year on record and lowest annual sea ice volume on record as climate change continues to abnormally warm the Arctic. The highly amplified wave pattern is much a product of the current weak La Nina pattern. However, the intensity of the amplification and resulting amplified warming of the Arctic is also a function of the long-term global warming regime dominating the polar region and causing record warmth and reductions in sea ice. I noticed this amplified wave pattern will have interesting impacts on the Arctic weather pattern and possibly the tenuous sea ice beginning next week.

Right now, a prominent surface high pressure region…associated with the Beaufort Gyre…is over the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska and eastern Siberia. By the middle of next week, this gyre will weaken as strong low pressure systems approach the Arctic from both the Bering Sea and the far North Atlantic.

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Prominent high pressure of the Beaufort Gyre over the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean.

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European Model depiction of low pressure system advancing into the Arctic Ocean from the Bering Sea on Christmas Eve. This may be the strongest in a series of lows (2-3) beginning late week. Stormy conditions will also impact areas near Svalbard (islands just east of northeast Greenland) late-week and weekend.
The Gyre is vulnerable because of the areas of open water and tenuous sea ice which remains over the Chukchi Sea…record low extent for this time of year. The ice being cold creates the surface high pressure system and clockwise circulation. But last year, this gyre collapsed because of slow sea ice growth allowing for storms with warm, moist air to move into the Arctic and further slowed sea ice growth. It appears this may be forecast to happen again during the tail end of this month.

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European Model forecast surface temperatures showing well above normal temps shifting northward late week into Christmas Eve over the Arctic Ocean north Svalbard and the Chukchi Sea. While exact values will change, general pattern appears likely.
Depending on the strength of the low pressure systems, not only will the tenuous sea ice in the Arctic…widespread areas 1.5 meters or less in thickness (less than a meter in the Chukchi Sea)…deal with more warm air temperatures limiting sea ice growth, but also wave action which may destroy the ice, particularly from the Pacific side as cyclones are expected to move across the Arctic from the Pacific. We’ll see how much impact those storms have and how intense they are. If the upper-level wave pattern is as amplified as forecast by models 5-8 days out (no reason to think otherwise as he reach the point of good reliability for the upper-atmosphere), it’s a good set up for strong low pressure systems to develop in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. And with the highly amplified blocking high over the Eastern Pacific, storms will be forced to track into Alaska and into the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas and deep Arctic Ocean.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey