Surreal view…a major hurricane near Western Europe.

Incredible views today…

Hurricane Ophelia set two records: 1) The highest latitude major hurricane on record in the North Atlantic Basin, set beginning at 35.9 N and 2) the most easterly major hurricane on record in the basin, set beginning at 26.6W. It will likely weaken below major hurricane force by Sunday morning as it begins to undergo transition into a frontal cyclone from its interaction with the jet stream and further reduction of sea surface temperatures below 72 degrees F/22 degrees C. However, it will be one for the record books.

Fortunately, Ireland and the United Kingdom will not need to worry about a major hurricane hitting them. They will need to worry about a likely damaging windstorm from a post-tropical hybrid cyclone. The post-tropical incarnation will develop frontal characteristics as it initially weakens, but its strong inner warm-core will continue to release some heat into the system, re-intensifying it as it becomes fully embedded in the mid-latitude westerlies and races into Ireland and the UK Monday afternoon and evening. My updated forecast for Ireland is below. Still expecting winds capable of downing trees and causing major power disruptions. The forecast for intense winds is high in confidence as computer models hone in on the center of the storm either coming ashore the southern tip of Ireland or just grazing the western shore. This is favorable for a “big blow” over the entire island. Residents need to be prepared to stay indoors and stay safe during the day Monday.

Ireland Forecast for Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia:

 

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Forecast zones (North and South) used for my forecast.

 

Monday Morning (After 7 am local time): For the southern half of the island, wind gusts of 40-50 mph (64-80 km/h) will develop during the morning, increasing to 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) by mid to late morning from the coast, northward. The strongest gusts will be along the coastal areas, especially the south shores where isolated gusts may approach 100 mph (161 km/h). For the northern half of the island, wind gusts to 40 mph will develop mid morning , increasing to 50-60 mph late morning, from south to north.

Monday Afternoon (After noon): For the south, wind gusts of 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) early afternoon with isolated to 100 mph/161 km/h along the south/southeast shores). For the north, wind gusts of 50-60 mph (80-97 km/h) early afternoon will increase to 60-85 mph by mid afternoon with isolated gusts to 100 mph along the northeast shores, spreading from south to north into the late afternoon.

Monday Night (after 5 pm local time): For the south, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph (64-89 km/h) during the early evening from south to north. For the north, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph during the mid to late evening (after 7 pm) from south to north.

Sea conditions will be hazardous all around Ireland with wind gusts in excess of 100 mph (161 km/h) likely in the south coastal waters and in the Irish Sea.

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High-resolution Swiss model showing the tightly-packed circulation of then Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia reaching coastal Ireland midday Monday. Damaging winds will be spreading throughout the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland by this time. Shown for illustration of the overall forecast scenario.
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Analysis and Forecast Impacts of Post-Tropical Ophelia in Ireland Monday

Hurricane Ophelia is a high-latitude hurricane by tropical standards…a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph as of 11 pm AST…moving south of Azores at 20 mph.

Analysis
Analysis of meteorological state around Hurricane Ophelia at 2 am AST. The hurricane is moving south of the Azores island chain and will pass between the Azores and Portugal Sunday morning.

This hurricane, is on track to take its already unusual path northward toward a collision course with Ireland and the United Kingdom Monday and Tuesday!

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National Hurricane Center advisory on Ophelia and it’s path. It’s expected to reach Ireland as a “post-tropical” cyclone…a hybrid frontal system…on Monday. VERY rarely are tropical cyclones, particularly any stronger than Category 1 located in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean.

Not to worry, however. Ophelia will NOT be a tropical cyclone when it arrives in the British Isles Monday. Sunday, the hurricane will begin to pass over much cooler waters between the Azores and Portugal (and note, the hurricane is currently over waters 2-3 degrees C/~3.5-5.5 degrees F above normal). At the same time, if you look at the previous satellite analysis, the hurricane will begin to interact with the existing frontal zone and ingest air from an approaching cold air mass moving in from the North Atlantic. This will begin the process of extratropcial transition where Ophelia becomes a mid-latitude frontal system. However, because of its old, warm tropical air mass, it will continue to retain some of its internal energy, enabling it to be a powerful hurricane-force windstorm.

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European “Euro” Model showing Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia approaching Ireland Monday morning (AST). Other global computer models vary the center of circulation either just offshore the west shore of Ireland or make landfall over southern Ireland Monday morning.
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Euro Model showing damaging wind gusts overspreading Ireland from south to north Monday. Models generally agree with bringing damaging wind gusts of 75-85 mph (~120-135 km/h) to the south and southwest coast of Ireland Monday afternoon (local time) with isolated gusts over 100 mph (~160 km/h). Gusts to 60-65 mph (97-105 km/h) with isolated higher gusts to 75 mph (120 km/hr) in the south of the island will be possible across much of the rest of the country into Northern Island Monday evening and night. All surrounding coastal waters will be hazardous for marine interests.

I have moderate confidence in my forecast…some uncertainty deals with the track of the low pressure system. A track farther offshore to the west would limit significant winds to the south and west shores and coastal communities. A track very close or even onshore the south coast would send very high winds deeper inland into Ireland. Regardless, those in the country should expect widespread downed trees, power outages, and difficult driving conditions for high-profile vehicles during the afternoon into late evening Monday.


Here is the climatological history of all known tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic just to show the rarity of systems such as Ophelia. Although some cyclones may have been missed prior to the satellite area, it is possible that such cyclones were less likely to survive in the distant past because of cooler waters where Ophelia is located now. Sea surface temperatures have warmed on Earth because of climate change.

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All hurricane tracks in the North Atlantic (1851-2012). Note, tracks heading to near the British Isles were likely as extratropical systems. Hurricane Vince, however, made a historic landfall as a tropical depression in southern Spain in October 2005.
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Ophelia is over waters 2-3 degrees C above normal. The hurricane will move away from waters favorable for hurricane maintenance during the day Saturday.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

California Fire Crisis (Wed Updates)

Update at 11:15 pm PDT Wed:

The Wine Country Fires in Northern California have now destroyed over 3500 structures, making it the most destructive fire event in state history. And with 23 deaths now reported, it is quickly approaching the record for the deadliest. There are still areas burned where police have yet to search for potential victims because the primary operations are focused on evacuations and maintaining safety in the current fluid situation. Unfortunately, given that the missing persons are over 280, even with many being found safe, the death toll is still likely to go up as some are found.

Amazing the disturbing level of destruction of this fire event. I was only 7 yrs old in 1991, but I remember the Oakland Hills Firestorm, as it was plastered all over the news as much as this event. I didn’t think I could imagine such a disastrous fire worse than that.

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Update at 5:30 pm PDT Wed: Update on the Meteorological Conditions in the Bay Area/Napa Valley Region.

Numerous fires continue to largely out of control over the Napa Valley/North Bay region. Heavy Smoke (with particulate matter >2.5 micrometers) is spreading southward over the Greater Bay Area reducing visibility and causing air quality to be considered very unhealthy for all individuals in the region with VERY UNHEALTHY conditions in the hilly terrain east of Santa Rosa and Oakland. If you can stay indoors, do so, especially for the young, elderly, and those with chronic breathing problems.

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Particulates
Particulate smoke (<2.5 micrometers) being produced by the fires and spread southward from northerly winds. This is causing very poor air quality across the state of CA. (earth.nullschool.net)

A RED FLAG WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR MUCH OF N. AND C. CALIFORNIA FROM NOW UNTIL TOMORROW AFTERNOON. As high pressure builds across Oregon into NE. Nevada, easterly downsloping winds will intensify the foothills across the interior of Northern CA, increasing the threat for any fires which develop to spread quickly and existing fires to expand acreage quickly. These winds will help maintain very conditions longer into the night, slowing humidity recovery and allowing fires to potentially exhibit extreme behavior (heat, forward speed, self-maintenance). Winds may gust up to 45-50 mph in some areas.

Map
High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model forecast for around 10 pm PDT showing the intensifying pressure gradient and pressure ridging over the hills and mountains of northern CA. This will lead to development and intensification of dry Diablo winds overnight.
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The HRRR forecast valid for 1 am PDT showing widespread dew point temperatures in the mid-20s. With temps in the mid/upper-50s, this means humidity values in the 25-35% range, keeping fuels relatively dry for spreading fire in the face of 40-50 mph wind gusts near the foothills.

These fires have largely been a result of 1) the 5 yr extreme drought weakening trees 2) the very wet winter producing abundant brush growth 3) extreme hot, dry summer drying out all fuels.

New evacuation orders have already come out for some areas, including the City of Calistoga (northeast of Santa Rosa) where the entire town of over 5,000 are being told to leave. See the Impact Statement at the bottom of this post…but folks need to be ready to evacuate if necessary at a moment’s notice.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

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CalFire has updated news at 11:30 am PDT and now say 21 people have been confirmed killed and 172,000 acres have now burned across the entire state. The most destructive fires are in North-Central California north of the Bay Area, but the Canyon 2 Fire continues to menace Anaheim in Southern California.

A RED FLAG WARNING is in effect for much of the interior valleys and foothill terrain of California.


This is for extreme fire danger today – Thursday. As high pressure builds this evening and tonight over Nevada and east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, a NE-SW pressure gradient will intensify, leading to strong downslope winds known as Diablo winds or Santa Ana Winds (the former in Northern CA, the latter in Southern CA). These winds will gust potentially 40-45 mph+. In addition, because they are downsloping, the air undergoes adiabatic warming…warming caused by the air compressing as it flows down toward higher vertical pressure at lower elevations. The air not only warms, but also dries out, turning winds blasting out of canyons into a hot blow dryer…drying out fuels and allowing a fire to turn into a firestorm.

IMPACT STATEMENT:

I CANNOT STRESS ENOUGH…if you live in areas under the red flag warning or if you know anyone who lives in these areas, especially near the urban-wildland interface…please have a plan of what to do if a mandatory evacuation is ordered for your area and have a way to get warnings. ESPECIALLY AT NIGHT. Stay in contact with friends/relatives, have someone stay up to watch tv or listen to radio, keep your phone on and charged, have a weather radio. Most importantly, make sure those smoke detectors are working as they may be a final warning of danger impacting your home at night. These fires may intensify or new ones may start Wed night-Thurs morning because of strengthening winds and the humidity…which normally increases at night…may not do so because of the very dry nature of the winds. This will allow for potentially explosive fire behavior. And please, be smart with anything related to flammable materials and clear any brush away from your home if possible, to give you more time if a fire does approach.

I really hope the situation does not worsen significantly. Fires are scary events and incredibly destructive. Please be safe and be ready if you are in these areas.

I’ll have updates on this page throughout today and tonight.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

 

Update on Wildfire Situation in Northern California.

The Northern California wildfires continue to rage and risk both lives and property. At least fifteen fires are currently burning across Northern California with little to no containment. The most significant fires include the Atlas Fire, Tubbs Fire, the Cascade Fire, Nuns Fire, and the Redwood Complex Fire. As of 8 pm PDT, there have been 17 deaths reported (11 in Sonoma, 2 in Napa, 3 in Mendocino and 1 in Yuba Counties). 180 people have been reported missing in Sonoma County with 57 out of originally 240 reported missing found since yesterday. More than 2,000 structures have been destroyed. 115,000+ acres have been burned with many fires at 0% containment.

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A SUV burns in the driveway of an already burned down home threatening another home in neighborhood off Fountaingrove Parkway near the Hilltop in Santa Rosa on October 9, 2017 in Santa Rosa, California. (Photo: Brian Van Der Brug/LA Times Via Getty Images).

Today, the atmospheric conditions were initially better for fighting fires this morning with higher humidity values and low winds. Winds have remained lighter today compared to previous days, but humidity has once again dropped this afternoon below 30% or even 20% in many areas in the hilly elevated terrain down into Napa Valley, allowing fires to continue to steadily spread.

Humidity
Low humidity values north of the Bay Area allowing fires to more easily attack vegetation and structures. (earth.nullschool.net).
Particulates
Very high surface particulates causing very poor to hazardous air quality over much of Northern California (particulate matter on map <2.5 micrometers). (earth.nullschool.net).

I wish there was more good news to give to the folks in NorCal, but unfortunately, NO rain is forecast for the region for the next seven days. In addition, the National Weather Service issued a RED FLAG WARNING for Wed Night-Thurs Afternoon as high easterly winds blowing out of the hilly terrain will produce very low humidity, allowing for potentially explosive wildfire growth.

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Global Forecast System model forecast valid 1 am PDT Thursday morning showing high pressure building over the elevated terrain of Nevada and northeast California. Strong easterly downsloping winds will develop, intensifying wildfire potential.
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Global Forecast System model forecast valid 1 am PDT Thursday morning showing wind gusts of 25-45 mph across north-central California.
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Global Forecast System model forecast valid 1 am PDT Thursday morning showing humidity values falling below 25%, keeping fuels dry for fires to spread.

If you know anyone in or near the effected region (or in the RED FLAG WARNING areas), tell them to make sure they clear vegetation near their homes/businesses and have an emergency plan in case evacuations are issued for their area. Unfortunately, this wildfire disaster is ongoing and requires those who are in or near rural country to be ready to escape at a moment’s notice.

Live Updates by the San Francisco Chronicle: HERE

—Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Update on Hurricane Maria (2:30 pm EDT). High winds and flooding rains impacting Puerto Rico.

Hurricane Maria is beginning to emerge from the island of Puerto Rico after the center made landfall 8 1/2 hrs ago as a Category 4 storm with max winds of 155 mph (Cat 5 is 156+ so catastrophic wind speeds occurred). 

The hurricane is now a Category 3 storm with 115 mph sustained winds and gusts over 130 mph near the center. Damaging winds and torrential flooding rains will continue for the rest of the afternoon as the system continues to push out into open ocean water.


Most computer models indicate the system should remain offshore the United States as it moves north in a weakness in the upper level higher pressure field caused by the presence of Tropical Storm Jose offshore the Mid-Atlantic and southern New England.

 
The crucial timing to be rid of Maria forever will be the approach of a significant upper level trough of low pressure from the Midwest midweek next week to “kick” the dying hurricane out to sea. Most models show this connection keeping the system offshore being, however there is higher variability in the track after Monday which could bring the system closer to shore than expected. Currently, I feel direct impacts…the tropical storm force wind field and significant rain bands…will likely (66%+ probability) stay offshore. But potential variability makes the situation worth watching closely. 

Regardless, high surf and rip currents (currents which pull water offshore and make swimming dangerous) are likely by early next week. The system will also be weaker offshore the East Coast thanks to less intense sea surface temperatures and increasing vertical wind shear from mid-latitude winds.

In the meantime, direct impacts from a Cat 3-4 storm are likely for north coast of the Dominican Republic, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southern Bahamas. Hurricane warnings are in effect for all these areas. 

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Update on Hurricane Maria (9:25 am EDT). Catastrophic flash flood/violent wind event ongoing.

Maria made landfall as a powerful Category 4 storm near Yabucoa, PR with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph and minimum central pressure of 917 millibars (at 6:35 am EDT). The hurricane continues to move across the island delivering destructive hurricane force winds and torrential amounts of rain leading to massive flash flooding (including 5-7 inch/hr rainfall rates).

The storm currently has max winds of 145 mph. 

River gauges across PR are rising incredibly fast from the high rainfall rates:


Radar near time of landfall (currently offline):

Update on Hurricane Maria (6:30 am EDT)

#Maria is making landfall in eastern Puerto Rico as a Category 4 Hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph. Gusts of 160+ are likely in progress over northeast coast of PR. Catastrophic weather conditions will continue to spread across the island over the next couple of hours. 

Terrible situation for the 3.5 million people hunkering down this morning. 

PR Radar failed just before 6 am EDT. More inbound winds of 155 mph or higher as eyewall moved over radar site (which is in elevated terrain and winds likely much stronger).