Surreal view…a major hurricane near Western Europe.

Incredible views today…

Hurricane Ophelia set two records: 1) The highest latitude major hurricane on record in the North Atlantic Basin, set beginning at 35.9 N and 2) the most easterly major hurricane on record in the basin, set beginning at 26.6W. It will likely weaken below major hurricane force by Sunday morning as it begins to undergo transition into a frontal cyclone from its interaction with the jet stream and further reduction of sea surface temperatures below 72 degrees F/22 degrees C. However, it will be one for the record books.

Fortunately, Ireland and the United Kingdom will not need to worry about a major hurricane hitting them. They will need to worry about a likely damaging windstorm from a post-tropical hybrid cyclone. The post-tropical incarnation will develop frontal characteristics as it initially weakens, but its strong inner warm-core will continue to release some heat into the system, re-intensifying it as it becomes fully embedded in the mid-latitude westerlies and races into Ireland and the UK Monday afternoon and evening. My updated forecast for Ireland is below. Still expecting winds capable of downing trees and causing major power disruptions. The forecast for intense winds is high in confidence as computer models hone in on the center of the storm either coming ashore the southern tip of Ireland or just grazing the western shore. This is favorable for a “big blow” over the entire island. Residents need to be prepared to stay indoors and stay safe during the day Monday.

Ireland Forecast for Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia:

 

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Forecast zones (North and South) used for my forecast.

 

Monday Morning (After 7 am local time): For the southern half of the island, wind gusts of 40-50 mph (64-80 km/h) will develop during the morning, increasing to 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) by mid to late morning from the coast, northward. The strongest gusts will be along the coastal areas, especially the south shores where isolated gusts may approach 100 mph (161 km/h). For the northern half of the island, wind gusts to 40 mph will develop mid morning , increasing to 50-60 mph late morning, from south to north.

Monday Afternoon (After noon): For the south, wind gusts of 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) early afternoon with isolated to 100 mph/161 km/h along the south/southeast shores). For the north, wind gusts of 50-60 mph (80-97 km/h) early afternoon will increase to 60-85 mph by mid afternoon with isolated gusts to 100 mph along the northeast shores, spreading from south to north into the late afternoon.

Monday Night (after 5 pm local time): For the south, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph (64-89 km/h) during the early evening from south to north. For the north, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph during the mid to late evening (after 7 pm) from south to north.

Sea conditions will be hazardous all around Ireland with wind gusts in excess of 100 mph (161 km/h) likely in the south coastal waters and in the Irish Sea.

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High-resolution Swiss model showing the tightly-packed circulation of then Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia reaching coastal Ireland midday Monday. Damaging winds will be spreading throughout the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland by this time. Shown for illustration of the overall forecast scenario.
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Hurricane Ophelia now a very rare Category 3 storm south of Azores

Hurricane Ophelia has strengthened into a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph as it moves south of the Azores. It is moving over prime atmospheric conditions, even as it overcomes waters of only 25 degrees C/77 degrees F. In normal tropical environments, tropical cyclones need water temperatures of 26 degrees C/79 degrees F to maintain themselves and warmer to significantly strengthen. However, the colder temperatures in the upper-atmosphere associated with the mid-latitude troposphere is providing Ophelia with ample atmospheric instability (warm, moist air rising into cold air aloft intensifying thunderstorm activity). In addition, mid-latitude dynamics are playing a role…the approaching frontal system and associated upper-level trough of low pressure approaching Ophelia is giving the system a “poleward outflow jet” to pull air away from the system and allow the surface low to strengthen.

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Meteorological Analysis of Category 3 Hurricane Ophelia. Favorable dynamic and thermodynamic set up allowing system to strengthen at high latitude, over cooler waters for hurricane maintenance. With that said, water temps under Ophelia are running 2-3 degrees C above normal, also allowing it to have its unusual intensity near Western Europe.

See my previous post from late last night for my wind forecast for Ireland. Strong winds should begin to impact the island midday Monday (local time), with stormy conditions lasting into Monday night. The southeastern Azores will see some gusty winds and 1-3 inches of rain as it passes by this evening and night.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Analysis and Forecast Impacts of Post-Tropical Ophelia in Ireland Monday

Hurricane Ophelia is a high-latitude hurricane by tropical standards…a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph as of 11 pm AST…moving south of Azores at 20 mph.

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Analysis of meteorological state around Hurricane Ophelia at 2 am AST. The hurricane is moving south of the Azores island chain and will pass between the Azores and Portugal Sunday morning.

This hurricane, is on track to take its already unusual path northward toward a collision course with Ireland and the United Kingdom Monday and Tuesday!

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National Hurricane Center advisory on Ophelia and it’s path. It’s expected to reach Ireland as a “post-tropical” cyclone…a hybrid frontal system…on Monday. VERY rarely are tropical cyclones, particularly any stronger than Category 1 located in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean.

Not to worry, however. Ophelia will NOT be a tropical cyclone when it arrives in the British Isles Monday. Sunday, the hurricane will begin to pass over much cooler waters between the Azores and Portugal (and note, the hurricane is currently over waters 2-3 degrees C/~3.5-5.5 degrees F above normal). At the same time, if you look at the previous satellite analysis, the hurricane will begin to interact with the existing frontal zone and ingest air from an approaching cold air mass moving in from the North Atlantic. This will begin the process of extratropcial transition where Ophelia becomes a mid-latitude frontal system. However, because of its old, warm tropical air mass, it will continue to retain some of its internal energy, enabling it to be a powerful hurricane-force windstorm.

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European “Euro” Model showing Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia approaching Ireland Monday morning (AST). Other global computer models vary the center of circulation either just offshore the west shore of Ireland or make landfall over southern Ireland Monday morning.
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Euro Model showing damaging wind gusts overspreading Ireland from south to north Monday. Models generally agree with bringing damaging wind gusts of 75-85 mph (~120-135 km/h) to the south and southwest coast of Ireland Monday afternoon (local time) with isolated gusts over 100 mph (~160 km/h). Gusts to 60-65 mph (97-105 km/h) with isolated higher gusts to 75 mph (120 km/hr) in the south of the island will be possible across much of the rest of the country into Northern Island Monday evening and night. All surrounding coastal waters will be hazardous for marine interests.

I have moderate confidence in my forecast…some uncertainty deals with the track of the low pressure system. A track farther offshore to the west would limit significant winds to the south and west shores and coastal communities. A track very close or even onshore the south coast would send very high winds deeper inland into Ireland. Regardless, those in the country should expect widespread downed trees, power outages, and difficult driving conditions for high-profile vehicles during the afternoon into late evening Monday.


Here is the climatological history of all known tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic just to show the rarity of systems such as Ophelia. Although some cyclones may have been missed prior to the satellite area, it is possible that such cyclones were less likely to survive in the distant past because of cooler waters where Ophelia is located now. Sea surface temperatures have warmed on Earth because of climate change.

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All hurricane tracks in the North Atlantic (1851-2012). Note, tracks heading to near the British Isles were likely as extratropical systems. Hurricane Vince, however, made a historic landfall as a tropical depression in southern Spain in October 2005.
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Ophelia is over waters 2-3 degrees C above normal. The hurricane will move away from waters favorable for hurricane maintenance during the day Saturday.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Firestorm devastating portions of Napa Valley, CA.

Sunday Night, major fires erupted in California’s Napa Valley under strong easterly winds and low relative humidity. This resulted in a conflagration engulfing communities and homes in flames and forcing thousands to make quick escapes in the early morning hours. One of the worse hit communities is Santa Rosa, where much of the city has been destroyed by fire. Over 1500 homes and businesses are believed to have been burned down in the Napa Valley region. The flames continue to grow at this time with over 75,000 acres burned.

Photos via the San Francisco Chronicle.

The fires are occurring in a region which is currently not in drought conditions hydrologically (as of last Thursday). However, after an unusually wet winter, an unusually hot, dry season followed. This allowed fuels, which grew in abundance following the wet season to dry out, leading to the massive fires in CA in this summer going into the Fall. Much of Western North America has been suffering significant fires in 2017 (year-to-date acreage burned in the US, as of Friday, was 3rd to 2012 and 2015). Intensifying wildfire seasons (on regional/continental scales) and increasing frequency of large fluctuations in extremes between very wet and very dry periods are predicted signals of climate change from global warming as well.

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Much above average to record precipitation in Northern California in January-March 2017.
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Much below average to record minimum precipitation (including NO measurable rain) in Northern California in August 2017. June-August 2017 saw much below average precipitation.
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Much above average and record warmth across the West Coast during August 2017. San Francisco Bay Area saw record highs over 100 degrees at the start of September.

So far the fires have killed 10 people (as of 10 pm PDT Monday Night), while more than 110 have been injured, some severely from burns, most from smoke inhalation. It’s being reported Monday Night that 100 missing persons reports have been called in to the Sonoma County, CA office.

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Region where fires are in progress in the San Rosa and Napa region far north of San Francisco and west of Sacramento.

Although relative humidity conditions will improve somewhat tomorrow, no rainfall is forecast for this region of Northern California for the next 7 days to dampen the fire situation. Winds Tuesday will likely gust over 20 mph and may be locally stronger near the fire, continuing the self-sustaining burn.

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11 pm PDT Monday Analysis by the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) showing the low dew point temperatures near and east of Santa Rosa. This area delineates a region of low relative humidity, allowing fires to burn and spread with little moisture on fuels to slow their extent.

 

For further updates see this updating page by the San Francisco Chronicle.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Potential Impacts by Tropical Storm Nate this Weekend

Tropical Storm Nate, which developed as a depression yesterday, made landfall in Nicaragua this morning and is moving over eastern Nicaragua and Honduras this evening. Very heavy rainfall and flash flooding has already resulted in 22 deaths in Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

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Heavy showers and thunderstorms producing heavy rain over portions of Central America from Tropical Storm Nate this evening and into tonight. (image valid at 5:15 pm CDT).

Nate is progressing generally northward and will emerge over the Northwest Caribbean Sea late tonight where it will have an opportunity to reorganize. The waters over that region are running in the range of 84-86 degrees F (29-30 degrees C), more than sufficient for re-intensification. With that said, the inner core will likely be badly “gutted” by the mountainous terrain of Nicaragua and Honduras and with a second landfall possible Friday evening, time will likely be limited for more robust intensification. With that said, minimal hurricane strength is possible, with a lower chance that the storm may get stronger if it’s inner core can re-organize quickly Friday.

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National Hurricane Center forecast (issued 5 pm EDT Thursday) showing a likely landfall on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico Friday evening and likely US impacts on the northern Gulf Coast beginning Saturday evening.

A Hurricane Watch and Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for much of the coastal Yucatan Peninsula. Again, the major threats will be from water…heavy rain and freshwater flooding and also modest (although still hazardous) storm surge and high wave action.

Potential Impacts for Central Gulf Coast of US-

While many details are still in need of being honed in for the Central Gulf Coast…it is highly likely a tropical storm or minimal hurricane will approach the region Saturday evening with landfall early morning Sunday. The biggest threats will be from water (flooding/surge) with wind producing damage from falling trees and power outages.

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NWS Weather Prediction Center 5 day accumulative rainfall forecast (valid beginning 7 pm CDT Thursday) showing heavy rainfall along the track of Nate and its remnants expected, particularly Saturday afternoon into early next week. Very heavy rainfall possible in Greater New Orleans area which is prone to freshwater flooding.

Sea surface temperatures are slightly cooler along the northern Gulf Coast north of the Loop Current (82-84 degrees F/28-29 degrees C). Still more than warm enough for intensification if the system can remain over the current (a slightly farther west track may leave it over slightly cooler waters longer).

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Analysis of Sea Surface Temperatures and the Loop Current. Nate will track along the Loop Current much of its track over water, providing with fuel to re-intensify. (Analysis by Earth Nullschool).

Also, given the shear currently over the Central Gulf will relax over the next couple of days (as an area of upper-level high pressure over Texas shifts westward and weakens), Nate will have an opportunity to re-intensify over the Gulf after leaving the Yucatan Peninsula. Computer models have some variability in timing of an upper trough which will move over the US Central Plains during the day Saturday. This will ultimately influence the exact track of the center of Nate. However both deterministic and ensemble members of the various models depict a likely landfall of the center somewhere from Southeast Louisiana to coastal Mississippi/Alabama. Regardless, widespread heavy rain (particularly near and east of the center), moderate storm surge flooding and high wind conditions will be likely over the coastal areas of these states by Saturday afternoon, spreading inland Saturday night and Sunday. Tropical storm force winds (sustained 39 mph+) will likely arrive on the LA Coast Saturday evening.

 

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Earliest Reasonable Arrival Time for Tropical Storm-Force (issued 5 pm EDT). Folks along the Central Gulf Coast should have preparations for stormy conditions completed by Saturday afternoon.

Tropical cyclone watches will likely be issued for portions of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama late tonight or early tomorrow morning.

Climatology Update-

The Atlantic Hurricane Season is currently running above normal (1966-2010 norms in parenthesis): 14 named storms (9), 8 hurricanes (6) and 5 major hurricanes (2). In terms of Accumulated Cyclone Energy (a function of maximum sustained winds over time), 2017 ranks (as of this post) as the 6th most active season on record for the North Atlantic Basin. The average temperature of the North Atlantic Main Development region (open tropics west of Africa) exceeded 83 degrees F (~28 degrees C) for the 9th time since 2002 (had never done so in the record prior going back to 1981). The MDR is the 3rd warmest on record overall.

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Start of October Drought and Climate Update

Nearly 14% of the Continental US is in at least moderate drought conditions right now. The most highly afflicted areas are over the northern tier states west of the Mississippi River…the Dakotas, Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon.

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There are scattered areas of drought and abnormally dry conditions across other parts of the country. However, an isolated area of severe to extreme drought has been hitting south-central Iowa for much of the summer and there are also areas of moderate drought developing over the the Desert Southwest and eastern Maine.

The level of dryness, particularly over Western North America has promoted a significant fire season, which continues at this time. British Columbia is having its worst fire season on record and the Western US is having an unexpectedly destructive fire season. This even after much of the region had a wet winter, showing that a significant period of dryness following well-grown fuels from a wet season can still lead to a major fire season. As of October 4, 2017, nearly record 8.5 million acres have been burned in the United States in 2017.* While below the 2015 record of 10.12 acres, it should be noted that anthropogenic climate change is increasing the risk of fire seasons in the US over 3 million acres and there has been a significant increase in fire seasons of 3 million acres or more since the turn of the century. 2017 may rank in the Top 3 for fire seasons (along with 2015 and 2012). Temperatures across the West were well-above normal or record levels over the summer. Various records for heat (as well as persistence of warmth and dryness) were broken in places such as Western WA/OR, central and southern CA as well as the portions of the Interior West.

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Drought Outlook for October 2017. Drought is expected to dissipate in Western WA from the incoming wet season, and improve somewhat in northeast MT. However, much of the drought in the US will persist and in fact additional areas may develop over the central Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states.
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The Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook valid Oct 10-16, 2017. This suggest by mid-month, the atmospheric pattern will be favorable for drier than normal conditions over the center of the nation with near normal or wetter than normal conditions over the coastal regions. The Climate Prediction Center also shows above normal temperatures likely over the Southwest US and Eastern third of the country. Dryness will maintain or promote further development of drought conditions in portions of the nation’s interior.

As of today, the NWS Climate Prediction Center indicates a 55-60% chance that a La Nina climate pattern will develop late in the Northern Hemisphere Fall and into the Northern Hemisphere winter. This is characterized by an intensified Walker Circulation (the east-west tropical Pacific wind circulation) and intensified cold water upwelling along and offshore the coast of South America.

Weather patterns common during La Nina events include abnormally wet, cool conditions in the western Pacific Northwest and TN/OH valleys, but abnormally dry and warm conditions across the southern tier of the United States. This is partially incorporated into the monthly and seasonal drought and temperature/precipitation outlooks.

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For those curious, the climate models are showing the US having a more than likely above normal winter throughout (including AK) with the La Nina-like distribution of precipitation (likely above normal Northwest, below normal Southeast). More on winter as we get closer.

*-I incorrectly stated that total acres burned in the US was around 3 million acres. (10/4/17)

2016 State of the Climate: The Sobering Data

Today The American Meteorological Society, in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released their yearly peer-reviewed “State of the Climate” report detailing the state of the global climate. It is…not positive at all.

You can see the full report HERE. But here are the bullet points:

-The report confirms, via independent datasets that 2016 was the warmest year on record for human observations (most world observations go back to mid-1800s). Not only for Earth’s atmosphere but for the Earth’s oceans.

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-The Earth’s surface averaged 1.06-1.21 degrees C above pre-industrial levels (depending on datasets available). It is the second year in a row the global land and ocean temperature averaged over 1 degree C. The “danger” zone for destructive impacts on human society and ecosystems around the world according to climate scientists is 2 degrees C or higher. Even 1.5 C would begin to have very hazardous impacts.

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-Global carbon dioxide concentration in Earth’s atmosphere (the main greenhouse gas being added by human activity) exceeded 400 part per million on average for the first time ever in human history. Not only that…This is the highest level in Earth’s atmosphere in at least 800,000 years based on data taken from ice cores. For comparison, pre-industrial levels of carbon dioxide concentration was approximately 280 ppm (only 150 yrs ago).

-The increase in the yearly average of carbon dioxide by 3.5 ppm from 2015 to 2016 is the largest increase observed in the 58 year history of observations.

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-2016 featured significant portions of land areas suffering from “extreme heat”…heat above the 90 percentile compared to the 1961-1990 average temperature for the location.

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-2016 was the warmest year on record for the ocean, causing major stresses for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs. Over 90% of global warming heating goes into the oceans (100+ zetajoules (1 x 10^23 joules) since 1993…it takes ~4 joules of heat to warm 1 gram of water by 1 degree C…it takes A LOT of energy to raise the temperature of water).

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-Sea levels are rising nearly everywhere, at different rates. Added water and thermal expansion by the heating of water are both factors. This is the 6th consecutive year of increase.

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-Severe drought impacted at least 12% of the planet’s land area each month of 2016 for the first time in history. (Note: The drought conditions in the Amazon Rain Forest in 2015-16 the third “100-year” event since 2005 with previous events in 2005 and 2010).

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-Arctic sea ice had its lowest winter maximum on record and second lowest summer minimum on record in 2016. The mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which has ice up to 110,000 yrs old and has the ability to contribute to up to 7 meters sea-level rise is at a record low value.

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-2016 was the 37th consecutive year of worldwide Alpine glacial retreat.

-Across the Northern Hemisphere, snow cover was the 4th least extensive in the 47-yr record.

-Record high temperatures at 20 meters were observed at depth in permafrost observatories in Alaska and Canada.

-The United States had the 2nd warmest year on record in 2016 and the 20th consecutive warmer than normal year.


It’s interesting that this came out today because I was actually just beginning to write the draft to the next in the series of WxClimoEd “Understanding Global Climate Change“. But then this blew up my Twitter LOL. This pretty much gives me a good addition to what I would’ve discussed anyways. So let’s do just that…

It appears to me that we have crossed in the 2015-2017 period some crucial thresholds in the “era” of anthropogenic climate change. We are continuing to pump more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than Earth can remove through natural processes. We are essentially heavily polluting our atmosphere with CO2. Earth itself appears to have become a “1 degree C” world in terms of average temperature and major impacts expected to develop as a result. In addition, while our atmosphere is heating up, our oceans are also taking in incredible amounts of energy, slowly heating up and it’s quite literally cooking our marine life, all while the oceans undergo acidification from the CO2 they are taking in which is also causing harm to ecosystems. Coral reefs are facing this head on along with hundreds of thousands of species with depend on them. This is discussed is in the documentary Chasing Coral, which I reviewed HERE.

This year…2017…continues to see further signs of major problems which were predicted to be likely results of climate change.

-The first six months of 2017 (January-June) was the second warmest on record behind 2016. It is also the second warmest on record for the United States.

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-July saw record heat for the Western US and Alaska including record July or all-time record maximum monthly temps and sea ice within range of the Arctic Ocean coast. Other cities such as Reno, NV and Salt Lake City had their hottest July’s ever. Miami set an all-time record hottest month ever. Death Valley, CA took its wild heat to another level with an average July temperature of 107.4 degrees F making it the hottest month ever recorded in the United States historical record.

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-Arctic sea ice is headed for (yet again) one of its lowest extents in the observational record.

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-Boreal forests continue to burn at an unprecedented rate not seen in the past 10,000 yrs. Most notably significant fires have broken out in Canada and in the peat of the Arctic on the border of the ice sheet on Greenland.

I’ll write more about the IMPACTS of climate change…estimates of global and regional effects that I intended on writing about hopefully later this week in my regular post series. But in short…we really have no time to lose on this. Governments and citizens MUST do what they can…from individual efforts to industry…to get carbon emissions down. The more carbon dioxide goes into the atmosphere and higher temperatures rise, the greater the uncertainty as far as resulting phenomena such as climate feedbacks which could either hinder or enhance climate change, the latter of course worsening the situation faster. We as humans, we live our lives and we really have no idea how fragile how our world really is. We must realize how destructive a force we are so we can be constructive to ourselves and our world instead.