Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia advancing on Ireland

Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia is quickly approaching Ireland with hurricane-force strength. It’s a fully non-tropical frontal system, but powerful one. Gusts of 45-55 mph are already occurring over the south coast of the country. My forecast for Ireland is HERE at the bottom, no significant changes since 24 hrs ago. Lots of wind and of course high surf. Stay safe if you’re located in Ireland or Scotland.

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Hurricane Ophelia Undergoing Extratropical Transition as it races for Ireland and the UK

Update at 6:50 pm CDT Sunday:

Ophelia appears to have nearly completed the process to Post-Tropical based on satellite imagery, with the whole arrangement of frontal boundaries and more asymmetric wind field and lack of any significant tropical characteristics outside of some convection (thunderstorm activity) northeast of the center. Ophelia is still a hurricane-force cyclone (likely top sustained winds 75-85 mph) and impacts still expected to quickly increase over Ireland Monday morning with rain, damaging winds and dangerous surf and coastal flooding.

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Hurricane Ophelia…at least it was still considered one at 11 am AST…is quickly transitioning to a hybrid post-tropical cyclone. I made up a schematic using current infrared satellite imagery. You can clearly see the transitioning hurricane becoming surrounded by cold, dry air on its’ back side, with its own warm, moist tropical air mass contributing to warm air advection ahead of it. And you can the developing frontal structure…cold front developing offshore Portugal and warm frontal cloud structure fanning out far to the north of the low center and offshore Ireland. The cyclone itself should be fully post-tropical in the next few hours, if it can’t be considered so already. Impacts (moderate to heavy rain and damaging winds) begin their arrival  Monday morning. My forecast for Ireland (written last night) can be found HERE.

Surreal view…a major hurricane near Western Europe.

Incredible views today…

Hurricane Ophelia set two records: 1) The highest latitude major hurricane on record in the North Atlantic Basin, set beginning at 35.9 N and 2) the most easterly major hurricane on record in the basin, set beginning at 26.6W. It will likely weaken below major hurricane force by Sunday morning as it begins to undergo transition into a frontal cyclone from its interaction with the jet stream and further reduction of sea surface temperatures below 72 degrees F/22 degrees C. However, it will be one for the record books.

Fortunately, Ireland and the United Kingdom will not need to worry about a major hurricane hitting them. They will need to worry about a likely damaging windstorm from a post-tropical hybrid cyclone. The post-tropical incarnation will develop frontal characteristics as it initially weakens, but its strong inner warm-core will continue to release some heat into the system, re-intensifying it as it becomes fully embedded in the mid-latitude westerlies and races into Ireland and the UK Monday afternoon and evening. My updated forecast for Ireland is below. Still expecting winds capable of downing trees and causing major power disruptions. The forecast for intense winds is high in confidence as computer models hone in on the center of the storm either coming ashore the southern tip of Ireland or just grazing the western shore. This is favorable for a “big blow” over the entire island. Residents need to be prepared to stay indoors and stay safe during the day Monday.

Ireland Forecast for Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia:

 

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Forecast zones (North and South) used for my forecast.

 

Monday Morning (After 7 am local time): For the southern half of the island, wind gusts of 40-50 mph (64-80 km/h) will develop during the morning, increasing to 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) by mid to late morning from the coast, northward. The strongest gusts will be along the coastal areas, especially the south shores where isolated gusts may approach 100 mph (161 km/h). For the northern half of the island, wind gusts to 40 mph will develop mid morning , increasing to 50-60 mph late morning, from south to north.

Monday Afternoon (After noon): For the south, wind gusts of 60-85 mph (97-137 km/h) early afternoon with isolated to 100 mph/161 km/h along the south/southeast shores). For the north, wind gusts of 50-60 mph (80-97 km/h) early afternoon will increase to 60-85 mph by mid afternoon with isolated gusts to 100 mph along the northeast shores, spreading from south to north into the late afternoon.

Monday Night (after 5 pm local time): For the south, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph (64-89 km/h) during the early evening from south to north. For the north, wind gusts will gradually decrease to 40-55 mph during the mid to late evening (after 7 pm) from south to north.

Sea conditions will be hazardous all around Ireland with wind gusts in excess of 100 mph (161 km/h) likely in the south coastal waters and in the Irish Sea.

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High-resolution Swiss model showing the tightly-packed circulation of then Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia reaching coastal Ireland midday Monday. Damaging winds will be spreading throughout the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland by this time. Shown for illustration of the overall forecast scenario.

Hurricane Ophelia now a very rare Category 3 storm south of Azores

Hurricane Ophelia has strengthened into a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph as it moves south of the Azores. It is moving over prime atmospheric conditions, even as it overcomes waters of only 25 degrees C/77 degrees F. In normal tropical environments, tropical cyclones need water temperatures of 26 degrees C/79 degrees F to maintain themselves and warmer to significantly strengthen. However, the colder temperatures in the upper-atmosphere associated with the mid-latitude troposphere is providing Ophelia with ample atmospheric instability (warm, moist air rising into cold air aloft intensifying thunderstorm activity). In addition, mid-latitude dynamics are playing a role…the approaching frontal system and associated upper-level trough of low pressure approaching Ophelia is giving the system a “poleward outflow jet” to pull air away from the system and allow the surface low to strengthen.

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Meteorological Analysis of Category 3 Hurricane Ophelia. Favorable dynamic and thermodynamic set up allowing system to strengthen at high latitude, over cooler waters for hurricane maintenance. With that said, water temps under Ophelia are running 2-3 degrees C above normal, also allowing it to have its unusual intensity near Western Europe.

See my previous post from late last night for my wind forecast for Ireland. Strong winds should begin to impact the island midday Monday (local time), with stormy conditions lasting into Monday night. The southeastern Azores will see some gusty winds and 1-3 inches of rain as it passes by this evening and night.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Analysis and Forecast Impacts of Post-Tropical Ophelia in Ireland Monday

Hurricane Ophelia is a high-latitude hurricane by tropical standards…a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph as of 11 pm AST…moving south of Azores at 20 mph.

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Analysis of meteorological state around Hurricane Ophelia at 2 am AST. The hurricane is moving south of the Azores island chain and will pass between the Azores and Portugal Sunday morning.

This hurricane, is on track to take its already unusual path northward toward a collision course with Ireland and the United Kingdom Monday and Tuesday!

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National Hurricane Center advisory on Ophelia and it’s path. It’s expected to reach Ireland as a “post-tropical” cyclone…a hybrid frontal system…on Monday. VERY rarely are tropical cyclones, particularly any stronger than Category 1 located in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean.

Not to worry, however. Ophelia will NOT be a tropical cyclone when it arrives in the British Isles Monday. Sunday, the hurricane will begin to pass over much cooler waters between the Azores and Portugal (and note, the hurricane is currently over waters 2-3 degrees C/~3.5-5.5 degrees F above normal). At the same time, if you look at the previous satellite analysis, the hurricane will begin to interact with the existing frontal zone and ingest air from an approaching cold air mass moving in from the North Atlantic. This will begin the process of extratropcial transition where Ophelia becomes a mid-latitude frontal system. However, because of its old, warm tropical air mass, it will continue to retain some of its internal energy, enabling it to be a powerful hurricane-force windstorm.

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European “Euro” Model showing Post-Tropical Cyclone Ophelia approaching Ireland Monday morning (AST). Other global computer models vary the center of circulation either just offshore the west shore of Ireland or make landfall over southern Ireland Monday morning.
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Euro Model showing damaging wind gusts overspreading Ireland from south to north Monday. Models generally agree with bringing damaging wind gusts of 75-85 mph (~120-135 km/h) to the south and southwest coast of Ireland Monday afternoon (local time) with isolated gusts over 100 mph (~160 km/h). Gusts to 60-65 mph (97-105 km/h) with isolated higher gusts to 75 mph (120 km/hr) in the south of the island will be possible across much of the rest of the country into Northern Island Monday evening and night. All surrounding coastal waters will be hazardous for marine interests.

I have moderate confidence in my forecast…some uncertainty deals with the track of the low pressure system. A track farther offshore to the west would limit significant winds to the south and west shores and coastal communities. A track very close or even onshore the south coast would send very high winds deeper inland into Ireland. Regardless, those in the country should expect widespread downed trees, power outages, and difficult driving conditions for high-profile vehicles during the afternoon into late evening Monday.


Here is the climatological history of all known tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic just to show the rarity of systems such as Ophelia. Although some cyclones may have been missed prior to the satellite area, it is possible that such cyclones were less likely to survive in the distant past because of cooler waters where Ophelia is located now. Sea surface temperatures have warmed on Earth because of climate change.

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All hurricane tracks in the North Atlantic (1851-2012). Note, tracks heading to near the British Isles were likely as extratropical systems. Hurricane Vince, however, made a historic landfall as a tropical depression in southern Spain in October 2005.
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Ophelia is over waters 2-3 degrees C above normal. The hurricane will move away from waters favorable for hurricane maintenance during the day Saturday.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Quick update on Northern California Wildfires (plus weather forecast)

As of now (5:30 pm PDT), the death toll in the California Wildfires is up to 35 and is expected to go up further. 18 in  Sonoma County, 9 in Mendocino County, 4 in Yuba County and 4 in Napa County. 5700 structures have been destroyed and 221,000 acres have been burned. Treating the conglomeration of fires as a single event (as all the Northern CA ones initiated Sunday Night), this is by far the most destructive fire event in state history and one of the deadliest. Simply horrifying and very sad.

Firefighters have begun to have some containment success the past 48 hrs with slower winds and at least some periods of slightly improved humidity. However, tonight-Sunday morning will feature an intensification of extreme fire danger. This is because a strong surface high pressure system will advance toward the central Intermountain West this weekend, intensifying downsloping Diablo winds from the hilly and foothill mountainous terrain of Northern California. North-northeast winds may gust as high as 45-60 mph Saturday, inducing very low humidity values, drying out fuels and potentially promoting extreme fire behavior (high forward speed, rapid growth) in existing fires as well as any new fires. Red Flag Warnings have been issued by the National Weather Service to cover this forecast potential.

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Strong high pressure moving over OR, ID and NV Saturday will promote strong Diablo winds over Northern California. (NWS forecast surface map valid 11 am PDT Saturday).

There are no thunderstorms forecast, so any new fires would be likely started by human activity. So folks in these areas need to very much be careful with anything which can potentially start fire and really…just avoid starting any outdoor fire or using  anything which sparks.

Some good news…mid-range computer model forecasts suggest a pattern shift toward precipitation and cooler weather by the end of next week. Just have to get through the next week of fire activity before some meaningful hydrologic relief to aid the firefighting efforts.

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The Global Forecast System Model forecast accumulated total precipitation valid 8 pm PDT Friday. This is one forecast scenario, but all global models point toward a wetter pattern, beginning the second half of next week into next weekend.

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Fire Conditions expected rest of this week and weekend for California

The fire conditions Wed Night into this morning were not as severe as expected thanks to weaker winds. This allowed firefighters to make some ground against fires through the night, however high fire danger remains and will continue for days into the future, with no rain in sight.

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Strengthening pressure gradients along the mountainous terrain of interior California and the warm, very dry air mass will promote high far danger with windy conditions near the mountains and adjacent valleys Fri Night-Sunday. (See tightly packed isobars…lines of equal pressure…on the map in CA just west of Nevada as high pressure shifts SE-ward over the Intermountain West).
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Very low dew points during the day Sat could mean relative humidity values as low as 10-20% across interior California, along with gusty winds for high fire danger.

Air quality remains terrible in the Bay Area. Folks in that region should do what they can to avoid being outside if at all possible.

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Unhealthy air quality exists across the entire Bay Area. Expect harmful air quality to be problematic into the weekend.

I’ll add any additional updates related to fires on this post today. Stay safe in these areas!

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey