Effect of Sun-Mon Arctic Ocean Storm on Sea Ice

You may remember I posted last Friday about the major North Atlantic storm which was expected to move into the Arctic Ocean Sunday and Monday producing hurricane-force winds, 30 ft+ waves and temperatures over 40 degrees F above normal (near or even above freezing in places). Well that storm advanced through the Arctic and now noticeable effects can be seen (via satellite analysis) on sea ice concentration (amount of ice vs. open water in a given area) and on sea ice sheet growth and resulting extent.

ATLSfc06Z.2018020509
North Atlantic Surface Analysis valid at 06 UTC February 5th (midnight CST) showing the 958 millibar low pressure system off shore northeast Greenland entering the Arctic Ocean from the North Atlantic basin. (US National Weather Service)
12ZAnalysis
Global Forecast System model analysis valid 12 UTC February 5th (6 am CST). This shows the very strong sustained winds and (by Arctic standards north of 80N) extremely warm temperatures during the height of the storm. This was thanks to very strong warm air advection from the Atlantic Ocean. The system had a sub-tropical connection with heat and moisture originating from the subtropical western Atlantic. Average temperatures in many places should be -30 to -15 F (-34 to -26 C). (earth.nullschool.net)

Included are two images of the sea ice concentration…one I saved from the February 3rd, another just posted for February 6th. Lighter blues are for 90-95% concentration, with yellows and reds being for 75-90%.

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Extent growth basically stopped between February 3-6 (near 13,300,000 sq km for four days).

extentdata
2018 year-to-date extent (currently at record lows) vs 2016 extent (previous daily record lows for this time of year) and the 1980s average. Sea ice extent and volume collapse is underway in the Arctic Ocean because of Anthropogenic Climate Change caused by abrupt warming in the Arctic (notable since the 1980s, accelerating since the 2000s). 

More very above normal temperatures will hit the Arctic this weekend as a powerful blocking high pressure system over the Pacific (sound familiar…) raises temps once again across Alaska and allows storm tracks to head for the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea once again. Meanwhile, the Atlantic side will continue to remain “open” with another storm also moving into the region this weekend. No storm appears to be nearly as powerful as the Sunday-Monday event, but the litany of systems bringing at least some wind, wave action and temps not far below the freezing point of salt water is no good for the Arctic.

ANOM2m_f90_arctic
Temperature anomaly (degrees above or below average) forecast by the GFS model for the Arctic region valid 18 UTC February 10th (noon CST). Normal is based on 1981-2010 baseline. To approximate the major effect of anthropogenic climate change since the end of the 18th century add +0.9 degrees C (K).
us_model-en-087-0_modusa_2018020700_90_15056_217
GFS maximum temperature forecast valid 18 UTC February 10th (noon CST). Very warm air temperatures on both the Atlantic and Pacific entrances to the Arctic Ocean.

Arctic sea ice is extremely important for everything from Arctic regional ecology, marine biology to effects on overall warming of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding land areas (and permafrost). There is also evidence that the rapid warming of the Arctic because of anthropogenic climate change is altering the polar jet stream circulation which may be leading to an increased frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events. 

sit_1_2018
Sea ice thickness and thickness anomalies in January 2018. (Zach Labe)

–Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

 

 

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Author: Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Meteorologist and geoscientist in Lincoln, NE. Seattle, WA native. Love weather, storm chasing/photography and planetary science.

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