Start of October Drought and Climate Update

Nearly 14% of the Continental US is in at least moderate drought conditions right now. The most highly afflicted areas are over the northern tier states west of the Mississippi River…the Dakotas, Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon.

20170926_conus_text

There are scattered areas of drought and abnormally dry conditions across other parts of the country. However, an isolated area of severe to extreme drought has been hitting south-central Iowa for much of the summer and there are also areas of moderate drought developing over the the Desert Southwest and eastern Maine.

The level of dryness, particularly over Western North America has promoted a significant fire season, which continues at this time. British Columbia is having its worst fire season on record and the Western US is having an unexpectedly destructive fire season. This even after much of the region had a wet winter, showing that a significant period of dryness following well-grown fuels from a wet season can still lead to a major fire season. As of October 4, 2017, nearly record 8.5 million acres have been burned in the United States in 2017.* While below the 2015 record of 10.12 acres, it should be noted that anthropogenic climate change is increasing the risk of fire seasons in the US over 3 million acres and there has been a significant increase in fire seasons of 3 million acres or more since the turn of the century. 2017 may rank in the Top 3 for fire seasons (along with 2015 and 2012). Temperatures across the West were well-above normal or record levels over the summer. Various records for heat (as well as persistence of warmth and dryness) were broken in places such as Western WA/OR, central and southern CA as well as the portions of the Interior West.

month_drought
Drought Outlook for October 2017. Drought is expected to dissipate in Western WA from the incoming wet season, and improve somewhat in northeast MT. However, much of the drought in the US will persist and in fact additional areas may develop over the central Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states.
814prcp.new
The Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook valid Oct 10-16, 2017. This suggest by mid-month, the atmospheric pattern will be favorable for drier than normal conditions over the center of the nation with near normal or wetter than normal conditions over the coastal regions. The Climate Prediction Center also shows above normal temperatures likely over the Southwest US and Eastern third of the country. Dryness will maintain or promote further development of drought conditions in portions of the nation’s interior.

As of today, the NWS Climate Prediction Center indicates a 55-60% chance that a La Nina climate pattern will develop late in the Northern Hemisphere Fall and into the Northern Hemisphere winter. This is characterized by an intensified Walker Circulation (the east-west tropical Pacific wind circulation) and intensified cold water upwelling along and offshore the coast of South America.

Weather patterns common during La Nina events include abnormally wet, cool conditions in the western Pacific Northwest and TN/OH valleys, but abnormally dry and warm conditions across the southern tier of the United States. This is partially incorporated into the monthly and seasonal drought and temperature/precipitation outlooks.

lanina-winterPNG

For those curious, the climate models are showing the US having a more than likely above normal winter throughout (including AK) with the La Nina-like distribution of precipitation (likely above normal Northwest, below normal Southeast). More on winter as we get closer.

*-I incorrectly stated that total acres burned in the US was around 3 million acres. (10/4/17)

Advertisements

Author: Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Meteorologist and geoscientist in Lincoln, NE. Seattle, WA native. Love weather, storm chasing/photography and planetary science.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s