My view of the August 21, 2017 Total Eclipse.

 

What an amazing event! The moon’s shadow gave a big show across America today and at 1:02 pm CDT it rushed over Lincoln, NE at over 1500 mph. Day turned to night, the temperature dropped and a 360 degree twilight ruled the midday.

First…my video!

20992919_932821256858176_2849467471142147863_n
Screen capture from video during totality in Lincoln, NE. Shows the “eclipse twilight” surrounding the city. Photo by me (Nick Humphrey).

The temperature in Lincoln dropped from 81 degrees around noon to 77 degrees after 1 pm and totality. Many locations along the eclipse path experienced temperature falls of 3-5 degrees as a result of the passage of the Moon’s shadow. Meteorologists also observed (both on the ground and with satellite imagery) the collapse of convective cumulus clouds dependent upon surface heating to “bubble”, which was lost during the advanced partial and total eclipses.

DHymzXlUMAAmwhZ
Cumulus cloud field impacted by the eclipse. Cloud field (12:42 pm CDT) dissipates by 2:32 pm CDT as totality approaches. Photo courtesy of AccuWeather Meteorologist Becky DePodwin. Lowering of temperature weakens upward convection currents likely limiting maintenance of cumulus clouds and leading to their dissipation in the absence of other lifting mechanisms.

You can watch the progression of the Moon’s shadow across North America below (video is only four seconds long so you’ll have to replay to see it more than once at a time):

All I can say is that this was one of most spectacular events of nature I’ve ever witnessed. I’ve witnessed multiple total lunar eclipses and while they are spooky (especially in the middle of the night), nothing can beat the powerful changes which a total solar eclipse can bring to the landscape.

The clouds, which were the most problematic for eclipse viewing in Nebraska ended up breaking enough to see totality itself, but also provided a canvas for the incredible glow of midday twilight. It was quite magical.

The next total solar eclipse in the Lower 48 is April 8, 2024. Totality in parts of Texas (which will include Austin and Dallas/Fort Worth Metro) could last nearly 4 1/2 min compared to the 2 min 40 sec max with today’s eclipse. If time and finances align, I definitely want travel for that one if I don’t live near it by then.

Anyone have any eclipse experiences they want to share? I’ll be checking out WordPress posts too! 🙂

PS-A view from a Omaha news station of the twilight colors with clouds HERE (video) within totality near Beatrice, NE, south of Lincoln.

Advertisements

Author: Meteorologist Nick Humphrey

Meteorologist and geoscientist in Lincoln, NE. Seattle, WA native. Love weather, storm chasing/photography and planetary science.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s